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Online Appendix to "Bounded Learning by Doing, Inequality, and Multi-Sector Growth: A Middle-Class Perspective"

Author

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  • Alain Desdoigts

    (University of Paris 1)

  • Fernando Jaramillo

    (Universidad del Rosario)

Abstract

Online appendix for the Review of Economic Dynamics article

Suggested Citation

  • Alain Desdoigts & Fernando Jaramillo, 2019. "Online Appendix to "Bounded Learning by Doing, Inequality, and Multi-Sector Growth: A Middle-Class Perspective"," Online Appendices 18-362, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:append:18-362
    Note: The original article was published in the Review of Economic Dynamics
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    File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/appendix/18/18-362/ADFJ_Appendices_RED_2018_362_Final.pdf
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    3. Reto Foellmi & Josef Zweimuller, 2006. "Income Distribution and Demand-Induced Innovations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(4), pages 941-960.
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    7. Halter, David & Oechslin, Manuel, 2010. "Inequality and Growth: The Neglected Time Dimension," CEPR Discussion Papers 8033, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    18. Dasgupta, Partha & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1988. "Learning-by-Doing, Market Structure and Industrial and Trade Policies," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 246-268, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giraldo, Iader & Jaramillo, Fernando, 2020. "International trade and “Catching up with the Joneses”: Are the consumption patterns convergent?," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 233-249.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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