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Causes of conflict in Sudan: Testing the Black Book

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  • Alex Cobham (QEH)

Abstract

The Black Book of Sudan claims to identify a pattern of political control - by people of its northern regions - which is unbroken during the post-independence period. This is the basis for the view of many of the rebels in the south and west of the country that the conflicts are the result not of racial or religious discrimination but rather of regional marginalisation. This paper uses the available data to evaluate the extent to which differences in regional access to power have resulted in differential human development progress. Indicators ranging from infant mortality to adult literacy, coupled with data on regional expenditure allocations, offer substantial support to the idea that policy has discriminated against the population of the southern and western regions, not least Darfur. The danger is that development community efforts that do not recognise the basis for the conflict may facilitate a continuation of the same distortions and sow the seeds for future conflict even before peace is achieved.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Cobham (QEH), "undated". "Causes of conflict in Sudan: Testing the Black Book," QEH Working Papers qehwps121, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:qeh:qehwps:qehwps121
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    File URL: http://www3.qeh.ox.ac.uk/RePEc/qeh/qehwps/qehwps121.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sanjaya Lall & Manuel Albaladejo & Jinkang Zhang, 2004. "Mapping fragmentation: Electronics and automobiles in East Asia and Latin America," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 407-432.
    2. John Weiss & Hossein Jalilian, 2004. "Industrialization in an age of globalization: some comparisons between East and South East Asia and Latin America," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 283-307.
    3. Puga, Diego & Venables, Anthony J., 1996. "The Spread of Industry: Spatial Agglomeration in Economic Development," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 440-464, December.
    4. Krugman, Paul, 1998. "What's New about the New Economic Geography?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 7-17, Summer.
    5. Lall, Sanjaya & Albaladejo, Manuel, 2004. "China's Competitive Performance: A Threat to East Asian Manufactured Exports?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1441-1466, September.
    6. Paul Lagunes & Oscar Pocasangre, 2017. "Dynamic Transparency: An Audit of Mexico’s Freedom of Information Act," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8551, Inter-American Development Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Baland, Jean-Marie & Moene, Karl Ove & Robinson, James A., 2010. "Governance and Development," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    2. James A. Robinson, 2009. "The Political Economy of Inequality," Working Papers 493, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2009.
    3. Frances Stewart & Alex Cobham & Graham Brown, 2007. "Promoting Group Justice: Fiscal Policies in Post-Conflict Countries," Working Papers wp155, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    4. Arnim Langer & Abdul Raufu Mustapha & Frances Stewart, 2009. "Diversity and discord: Ethnicity, horizontal inequalities and conflict in Ghana and Nigeria," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(4), pages 477-482.
    5. James A. Robinson & Ragnar Torvik, 2016. "Endogenous Presidentialism," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 907-942, August.

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