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The impact of firm-type dominance on regional manufacturing growth

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  • Salvary, Stanley

Abstract

Availability of financial capital and location decisions are variables that influence regional manufacturing output. This study maintains that a region’s manufacturing growth depends upon the region’s firm-type dominance. That is, the type of firms that dominate the region’s manufacturing output can be classified as non-local (national or foreign - NF) vs. local and large vs. small. Accordingly, for policy analysis, regions can be classified by firm-type dominance. This distinction is important since, invariably, location decision options and availability of financial capital are more favourable for the larger NF firms than for local firms. In an attempt to assess the impact of firm-type dominance, this study draws upon the dominant industry model which has established that, in any given region, there is a dominant industry (the driving force of the region) to which a region’s manufacturing growth is linked. The information on the impact of firm-type dominance on a region's manufacturing output may enable policy-makers to design workable (or revise existing) manufacturing diversification policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Salvary, Stanley, 2007. "The impact of firm-type dominance on regional manufacturing growth," MPRA Paper 4623, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:4623
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/12440/3/MPRA_paper_12440.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Salvary, Stanley C.W., 1987. "An Empirical Test of the Dominant Industry Hypothesis: Some Preliminary Evidence," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 17(1).
    2. Helms, L Jay, 1985. "The Effect of State and Local Taxes on Economic Growth: A Time Series-Cross Section Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(4), pages 574-582, November.
    3. Carlton, Dennis W, 1983. "The Location and Employment Choices of New Firms: An Econometric Model with Discrete and Continuous Endogenous Variables," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(3), pages 440-449, August.
    4. Cletus C. Coughlin, 1992. "Foreign-owned companies in the U.S.: malign or benign?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 17-31.
    5. Harry W. Richardson, 1978. "The State of Regional Economics: A Survey Article," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 3(1), pages 1-48, October.
    6. Cletus C. Coughlin & Eran Segev, 2000. "Location Determinants of New Foreign-Owned Manufacturing Plants," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 323-351.
    7. Eric S. Rosengren, 1990. "How diversified is New England?," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Nov, pages 3-16.
    8. Ersenkal, Caryl R. & Dillman, B.L., 1984. "The Product Cycle and Shifts in the Location of Manufacturing," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 14(1).
    9. Bremmer, Dale S. & Kesselring, Randall G., 1993. "The Determinants of Regional Manufacturing Investment: A Simultaneous Equations Approach," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 23(2).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    state-regions and industry-regions; chemical industry region; regional policy analysis; manufacturing growth; firm-type dominance; availability of financial capital; dominant industry model; manufacturing firms' location decisions; regional economic development; foreign-owned manufacturing plants;

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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