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Impact Evaluation of a Privately Managed Tuition-Free Middle school in a Poor Neighborhood in Montevideo

Author

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  • Cid, Alejandro
  • Balsa, Ana

Abstract

Using a randomized trial, we evaluate the impact of a free privately-managed middle school in a poor neighborhood. The research compares over time adolescents randomly selected to enter Liceo-Jubilar and those that were not drawn in the lottery. Besides positive impacts on expectations, we find better educational outcomes in the treatment group relative to control subjects. The features of Liceo-Jubilar -autonomy of management, capacity for innovation, and adaptation to the context- contrast with the Uruguayan highly centralized and inflexible public education system. Our results shed light on new approaches to education that may contribute to improve opportunities for disadvantaged adolescents in developing countries. Unlike the experiences of charter schools in developed countries, Liceo-Jubilar does not have autonomy regarding the formal school curricula nor depends on public funding by any means.

Suggested Citation

  • Cid, Alejandro & Balsa, Ana, 2012. "Impact Evaluation of a Privately Managed Tuition-Free Middle school in a Poor Neighborhood in Montevideo," MPRA Paper 39913, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39913
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    Cited by:

    1. Balsa, Ana & Cid, Alejandro, 2014. "Advancing academic opportunities for disadvantaged youth: third year impact evaluation of a privately-managed school in a poor neighborhood in Montevideo," MPRA Paper 59961, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Edgardo Zablotsky, 2015. "Postales sobre educacion en la Argentina, 2015," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 579, Universidad del CEMA.
    3. Edgardo Zablotsky, 2019. "Siete propuestas para continuar cambiando la realidad educativa," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 696, Universidad del CEMA.
    4. Cid, Alejandro, 2017. "Interventions Using Regular Activities to Engage High-Risk School-Age Youth: a Review of After-School Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean," MPRA Paper 84888, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Field Experiment; Poverty; Impact Evaluation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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