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Chinese Firms’ Political Connection, Ownership, and Financing Constraints

Author

Listed:
  • Yan, Isabel K.
  • Chan, Kenneth S.
  • Dang, Vinh Q.T.

Abstract

We empirically examine some listed Chinese firms’ political connection, ownership, and financing constraints. Politically-connected firms display no financing constraints whereas firms without connection experience significant constraints. Non-connected family-controlled firms bear greater constraints than non-connected state-owned firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Yan, Isabel K. & Chan, Kenneth S. & Dang, Vinh Q.T., 2011. "Chinese Firms’ Political Connection, Ownership, and Financing Constraints," MPRA Paper 35221, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:35221
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/35221/1/MPRA_paper_35221.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Poncet, Sandra & Steingress, Walter & Vandenbussche, Hylke, 2010. "Financial constraints in China: Firm-level evidence," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 411-422, September.
    2. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    3. Schiantarelli, Fabio, 1996. "Financial Constraints and Investment: Methodological Issues and International Evidence," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 70-89, Summer.
    4. MARA FACCIO & RONALD W. MASULIS & JOHN J. McCONNELL, 2006. "Political Connections and Corporate Bailouts," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(6), pages 2597-2635, December.
    5. Konings, Jozef & Rizov, Marian & Vandenbussche, Hylke, 2003. "Investment and financial constraints in transition economies: micro evidence from Poland, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria and Romania," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 253-258, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kam Ki Tang & Haishan Yuan, 2016. "Corruption Charges Against Executives and Stock Value of Chinese State Owned Enterprises," Discussion Papers Series 555, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    2. Cull, Robert & Li, Wei & Sun, Bo & Xu, Lixin Colin, 2015. "Government connections and financial constraints: Evidence from a large representative sample of Chinese firms," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 271-294.
    3. Chan, Kenneth S. & Dang, Vinh Q.T. & Li, Tingting & So, Jacky Y.C., 2016. "Under-consumption, trade surplus, and income inequality in China," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 241-256.
    4. Matthias Duschl & Shi-Shu Peng, 2013. "Chinese firm dynamics and the role of ownership type A conditional estimation approach of the Asymmetric Exponential Power (AEP) density," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2014-01, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    5. repec:eee:corfin:v:48:y:2018:i:c:p:275-291 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:chieco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:50-66 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ma, Xufei & Ding, Zhujun & Yuan, Lin, 2016. "Subnational institutions, political capital, and the internationalization of entrepreneurial firms in emerging economies," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 843-854.
    8. Liao, Jing & Malone, Chris & Young, Martin, 2016. "Politicians, insiders and non-tradable share reform decisions in China," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 58-73.
    9. repec:eee:worbus:v:52:y:2017:i:5:p:628-639 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political connection; investments; financing constraints; Chinese firms;

    JEL classification:

    • G31 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Capital Budgeting; Fixed Investment and Inventory Studies
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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