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Institution, economic development, and impact of natural disasters

Author

Listed:
  • Yamamura, Eiji

Abstract

This paper uses cross-country data from 1984 to 2008 to examine how institution influences the number of deaths caused by natural disasters. The major findings show that the number of deaths resulting from natural disasters is smaller in countries with less public sector corruption, and for OECD countries with better functioning legal systems, but not for non-OECD countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Institution, economic development, and impact of natural disasters," MPRA Paper 32069, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:32069
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/32069/1/MPRA_paper_32069.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eiji Yamamura, 2010. "Effects of Interactions among Social Capital, Income and Learning from Experiences of Natural Disasters: A Case Study from Japan," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(8), pages 1019-1032.
    2. Mark Skidmore & Hideki Toya, 2002. "Do Natural Disasters Promote Long-Run Growth?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(4), pages 664-687, October.
    3. Monica Escaleras & Nejat Anbarci & Charles Register, 2007. "Public sector corruption and major earthquakes: A potentially deadly interaction," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 209-230, July.
    4. Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "The Death Toll from Natural Disasters: The Role of Income, Geography, and Institutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 271-284, May.
    5. Toya, Hideki & Skidmore, Mark, 2007. "Economic development and the impacts of natural disasters," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 20-25, January.
    6. World Bank, 2010. "World Development Indicators 2010," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 4373, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Li, C. & van Bergeijk, P.A.G., 2016. "Do natural disasters stimulate international trade?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 622, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Natural disaster; law and order; corruption; economic development.;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • K10 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - General (Constitutional Law)
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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