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Aggregation of incomplete ordinal preferences with approximate interpersonal comparisons

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  • Pivato, Marcus

Abstract

We develop a model of preference aggregation where people's psychological characteristics are mutable (hence, potential objects of individual or social choice), their preferences may be incomplete, and approximate interpersonal comparisons of well-being are possible. Formally, we consider preference aggregation when individual preferences are described by an incomplete, yet interpersonally comparable, preference order on a space of psychophysical states. Within this framework we characterize three preference aggregators: the `Suppes-Sen' preorder, the `approximate maximin' preorder, and the `approximate leximin' preorder.

Suggested Citation

  • Pivato, Marcus, 2010. "Aggregation of incomplete ordinal preferences with approximate interpersonal comparisons," MPRA Paper 25271, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25271
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/25271/1/MPRA_paper_25271.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pivato, Marcus, 2010. "Risky social choice with approximate interpersonal comparisons of well-being," MPRA Paper 25222, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Amartya Sen, 1997. "Maximization and the Act of Choice," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(4), pages 745-780, July.
    3. Fishburn, Peter C, 1974. "Impossibility Theorems without the Social Completeness Axiom," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(4), pages 695-704, July.
    4. Sen, Amartya, 1970. "Interpersonal Aggregation and Partial Comparability," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 38(3), pages 393-409, May.
    5. Pivato, Marcus, 2010. "Approximate interpersonal comparisons of well-being," MPRA Paper 25224, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Baucells, Manel & Shapley, Lloyd S., 2008. "Multiperson utility," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 329-347, March.
    7. Arrow, Kenneth J, 1977. "Extended Sympathy and the Possibility of Social Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(1), pages 219-225, February.
    8. Kevin W. S. Roberts, 1980. "Possibility Theorems with Interpersonally Comparable Welfare Levels," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(2), pages 409-420.
    9. K. J. Arrow & A. K. Sen & K. Suzumura (ed.), 2002. "Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare," Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 1, number 1.
    10. Barthelemy, Jean-Pierre, 1982. "Arrow's theorem: unusual domains and extended codomains," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 79-89, July.
    11. Sen, Amartya K, 1972. "Interpersonal Comparison and Partial Comparability: A Correction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 40(5), pages 959-959, September.
    12. Michael Mandler, 2006. "Cardinality versus Ordinality: A Suggested Compromise," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1114-1136, September.
    13. Blackorby, Charles, 1975. "Degrees of Cardinality and Aggregate Partial Orderings," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 43(5-6), pages 845-852, Sept.-Nov.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pivato, Marcus, 2010. "Risky social choice with approximate interpersonal comparisons of well-being," MPRA Paper 25222, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Marcus Pivato, 2015. "Social choice with approximate interpersonal comparison of welfare gains," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 79(2), pages 181-216, September.
    3. Pivato, Marcus, 2010. "Approximate interpersonal comparisons of well-being," MPRA Paper 25224, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    interpersonal comparisons; well-being; ordinal; maximin; leximin; egalitarian; Suppes-Sen; incomplete preference;

    JEL classification:

    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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