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Explaining TFP Growth rates: Dissimilar effect of openness between different income groups of countries

  • González, Germán
  • Constantín, Sebastián

The discussion about the relationship between openness and economic growth is still open. The dissent is about the theoretical foundation of the relationship, and about the robustness of the positive effect that is presented in the empirical arena. Our paper has the purpose of incorporating new evidence to the discussion. To do that, we improve the process of TFP estimation and use new data sources. Our principal result is that there are important differences between groups of countries with regard to the relevant factors that explain the technological performance.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/17584/1/MPRA_paper_17584.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 17584.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17584
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  1. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mankiw, N Gregory & Romer, David & Weil, David N, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-37, May.
  3. Stephen M. Miller & Mukti P. Upadhyay, 2002. "Total Factor Productivity, Human Capital and Outward Orientation: Differences by Stage of Ddevelopment and Geographic Regions," Working papers 2002-33, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  4. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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