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Knowledge, Preferences and Shocks in Portfolio Analysis

Author

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  • Steinbacher, Matjaz

Abstract

We simulate social network games of a portfolio selection to analyze how knowledge, preferences of agents and their level of omniscience affect their decision-making. The key feature of the paper is that preferences and the level of omniscience of agents very much determine the ways agents make their decision. While omniscient agents respond very rapidly to the changing market conditions, non-omniscient agents are more resistant to such changes. By introducing one-time shock, we found that its efficiency depends on the level of omniscience of agents, with much stronger efficiency under omniscient agents.

Suggested Citation

  • Steinbacher, Matjaz, 2009. "Knowledge, Preferences and Shocks in Portfolio Analysis," MPRA Paper 13567, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13567
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/13567/1/MPRA_paper_13567.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dilip Abreu & Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2003. "Bubbles and Crashes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(1), pages 173-204, January.
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    3. Cont, Rama & Bouchaud, Jean-Philipe, 2000. "Herd Behavior And Aggregate Fluctuations In Financial Markets," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(02), pages 170-196, June.
    4. David Hirshleifer, 2001. "Investor Psychology and Asset Pricing," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(4), pages 1533-1597, August.
    5. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    6. Sushil Bikhchandani & David Hirshleifer & Ivo Welch, 1998. "Learning from the Behavior of Others: Conformity, Fads, and Informational Cascades," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 151-170, Summer.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrikopoulos, Andreas & Economou, Labriana, 2016. "Coauthorship and subauthorship patterns in financial economics," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 12-19.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    social networks; stochastic finance; shocks; portfolio analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games

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