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For better or for worse? Job and earnings mobility in nine middle- low-income countries: A comment

Author

Listed:
  • Reinhart, Carmen

Abstract

Comment on: Suzanne Duryea, Gustavo Márquez, Carmen Pagés, and Stefano Scarpetta, who review evidence on labor market mobility in nine countries. Three countries come from Latin America, while the remainder are transition economies in Eastern Europe. The period of study ranges from as little as two years to eleven years. The paper uses longitudinal labor force survey data to construct a transition matrix for each country. The authors consider six possible labor force outcomes: out of the labor force, unemployed, formal salaried worker, informal salaried worker, self-employed, and farmer.

Suggested Citation

  • Reinhart, Carmen, 2006. "For better or for worse? Job and earnings mobility in nine middle- low-income countries: A comment," MPRA Paper 13198, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13198
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/13198/1/MPRA_paper_13198.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gong, Xiaodong & Van Soest, Arthur & Villagomez, Elizabeth, 2004. "Mobility in the Urban Labor Market: A Panel Data Analysis for Mexico," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 1-36, October.
    2. Gerard Caprio & Patrick Honohan, 2008. "Banking Crises," Center for Development Economics 2008-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
    4. Haltiwanger, John & Kugler, Adriana & Kugler, Maurice & Micco, Alejandro & Pagés, Carmen, 2004. "Effects of tariffs and real exchange rates on job reallocation: evidence from Latin America," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0410, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    5. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Rose, Andrew K., 1996. "Currency crashes in emerging markets: An empirical treatment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-4), pages 351-366, November.
    6. John Haltiwanger & Adriana Kugler & Maurice Kugler & Alejandro Micco & Carmen Pages, 2004. "Effects of tariffs and real exchange rates on job reallocation: evidence from Latin America," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(4), pages 191-208.
    7. Maloney, William F, 1999. "Does Informality Imply Segmentation in Urban Labor Markets? Evidence from Sectoral Transitions in Mexico," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 275-302, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor market capital flows informal sector developing countries;

    JEL classification:

    • E26 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Informal Economy; Underground Economy
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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