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ECONOMIC AND BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN AN INDIVIDUAL fS DECISION TO TAKE THE INFLUENZA VACCINATION IN JAPAN

Author

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  • Yoshiro Tsusui

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University, Japan; CREED, FEB, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands)

  • Uri Benzion

    (Department of Economics, Ben Gurion University; Interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences, Western Galilee College, Israel)

  • Shosh Shahrabani

    (Economics and Management Department, Max Stern Academic College of Emek Yezreel, Israel)

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate what people in Japan consider when deciding to take the influenza vaccination. We develop an economic model to explain the mechanism by which people decide to take the influenza vaccination. Using our model and the data obtained from a large-scale survey we conducted in Japan, we demonstrated that people make rational decisions about vaccinations after considering its cost and benefits. People consider the probability of infection, severity of the disease, and the vaccination fs effectiveness and side effects. The time discount rate is another consideration because the timing of costs and benefits of the vaccination differ. Risk aversion (fearing the contraction of the flu and vaccination fs side effects) also affects the decision. People also deviate from rationality-altruism and status quo bias play important roles in the decision-making. Overconfidence indirectly affects the decision via perception variables such as the subjective probability of infection and assessment of influenza fs severity. The decision also depends on attributes such as gender, age, and marital status. If the general perception of flu and vaccination is inaccurate, supplying accurate information regarding those may increase or decrease the vaccination rate, depending on whether this perception is, respectively, higher or lower than the objective rates. Thus, we examine whether the general perception is biased. Our survey suggests that disseminating information on the vaccination fs effectiveness may increase the rate of vaccination, whereas that on the probability of infection may have the opposite effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Yoshiro Tsusui & Uri Benzion & Shosh Shahrabani, 2010. "ECONOMIC AND BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN AN INDIVIDUAL fS DECISION TO TAKE THE INFLUENZA VACCINATION IN JAPAN," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 10-23-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Feb 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:1023r
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jack L. Knetsch & J. A. Sinden, 1984. "Willingness to Pay and Compensation Demanded: Experimental Evidence of an Unexpected Disparity in Measures of Value," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 99(3), pages 507-521.
    2. Tsutsui, Yoshiro & Benzion, Uri & Shahrabani, Shosh & Din, Gregory Yom, 2010. "A policy to promote influenza vaccination: A behavioral economic approach," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(2-3), pages 238-249, October.
    3. Shosh Shahrabani & Uri Benzion & Gregory Yom Din, 2009. "Factors affecting nurses’ decision to get the flu vaccine," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 10(2), pages 227-231, May.
    4. John Mullahy, 1999. "It'll only hurt a second? Microeconomic determinants of who gets flu shots," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 9-24.
    5. Robert B. Barsky & F. Thomas Juster & Miles S. Kimball & Matthew D. Shapiro, 1997. "Preference Parameters and Behavioral Heterogeneity: An Experimental Approach in the Health and Retirement Study," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 537-579.
    6. Brito, Dagobert L. & Sheshinski, Eytan & Intriligator, Michael D., 1991. "Externalities and compulsary vaccinations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 69-90, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sorensen, Andrea Lockhart, 2015. "Asymmetry, uncertainty, and limits in a binary choice experiment with positive spillovers," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 43-55.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    influenza; inoculation; survey; time preference; Japan;

    JEL classification:

    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other

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