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Measuring the Impacts of ICT Using Official Statistics


  • OECD


Policy makers everywhere want to know about the social and economic impacts of ICT. The aim of this paper is to examine statistical issues associated with their measurement and to suggest areas for future work.

Suggested Citation

  • Oecd, 2008. "Measuring the Impacts of ICT Using Official Statistics," OECD Digital Economy Papers 136, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:stiaab:136-en

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    1. repec:cbu:jrnlec:y:2017:v:4:p:256-264 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Stockinger, Bastian, 2017. "The effect of broadband internet on establishments' employment growth: evidence from Germany," IAB Discussion Paper 201719, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    3. Anna Milford, 2014. "Co-operative or coyote? Producers’ choice between intermediary purchasers and Fairtrade and organic co-operatives in Chiapas," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 31(4), pages 577-591, December.
    4. Jean-Yves Hamel, 2010. "ICT4D and the Human Development and Capability Approach: The Potentials of Information and Communication Technology," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2010-37, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
    5. Hamel, Jean-Yves, 2010. "ICT4D and the human development and capabilities approach: the potentials of information and communication technology," MPRA Paper 25561, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Laura Raynolds, 2014. "Fairtrade, certification, and labor: global and local tensions in improving conditions for agricultural workers," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 31(3), pages 499-511, September.

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