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Raising Education Outcomes in Switzerland

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  • Andrés Fuentes

    (OECD)

Abstract

Almost all workers are educated at least to the upper secondary level and vocational education contributes to one of the most successful transition performances of youth to employment in the OECD. Higher education enjoys an excellent reputation, as reflected in one of the highest scientific publication rates relative to population in the OECD and high placements of Swiss universities in international rankings. Participation in continuous education is among the largest in the OECD. Results for children with low socio-economic background or immigration background do not fully measure up to the high standards of the education system. Improving early childhood education and availability of childcare facilities for very young children would raise subsequent educational attainment, especially for these groups of children. Accountability of schools for their education outcomes should be raised. In tertiary education, attainment rates among the young are modest for a high-income OECD country, reflecting the importance of the upper secondary vocational system. A larger supply of tertiary graduates could have benefits for productivity performance especially in the context of demographic ageing. Public spending per pupil on pre-primary education is low in international comparison whereas spending on tertiary academic education per graduate is among the highest in the OECD.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrés Fuentes, 2011. "Raising Education Outcomes in Switzerland," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 838, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:838-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kgj3l0wr4q6-en
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    compulsory education; education; education funding; pre-school education; Switzerland; tertiary education; university education;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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