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Liquidity Coinsurance, Moral Hazard and Financial Contagion

  • Sandro Brusco

    ()

    (Department of Economics, SUNY at Stony Brook)

  • Fabio Castiglionesi

    ()

    (Departament d’ Economia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. E-mail:)

We study the propagation of financial crises between regions characterized by moral hazard problems. The source of the problem is that banks are protected by limited liability and may engage in excessive risk taking. The regions are affected by negatively correlated liquidity shocks, so that liquidity coinsurance is Pareto improving. The moral hazard problem can be solved if banks are sufficiently capitalized. Under autarky, a limited investment is needed to achieve optimality, so that a limited amount of capital is sufficient to prevent risk-taking. With interbank deposits the optimal investment increases, and capital becomes insufficient to prevent excessive risk-taking. Thus bankruptcy occurs with positive probability and the crises spread to other regions via the financial linkages. Opening the financial markets is nevertheless Pareto improving; consumers benefit from liquidity coinsurance, although they pay the cost of excessive risk-taking. Finally, we show that in this framework a completely connected deposit structure is more conducive to financial crises than an incompletely connected structure.

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File URL: http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/economics/research/papers/2005/brucast.pdf
File Function: First version, 2005
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Paper provided by Stony Brook University, Department of Economics in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 05-12.

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Date of creation: Jul 2005
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Handle: RePEc:nys:sunysb:05-12
Contact details of provider: Postal: Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384
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Web page: http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/economics/
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  1. Aghion, Philippe & Bolton, Patrick & Dewatripont, Mathias, 2000. "Contagious bank failures in a free banking system," Scholarly Articles 12490629, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Freixas, Xavier & Parigi, Bruno & Rochet, Jean-Charles, 1999. "Systemic Risk, Interbank Relations and Liquidity Provision by the Central Bank," CEPR Discussion Papers 2325, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Laura E. Kodres & Matthew Pritsker, 2002. "A Rational Expectations Model of Financial Contagion," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(2), pages 769-799, 04.
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  5. Hans Degryse & Grégory Nguyen, 2004. "Interbank exposures: an empirical examination of systemic risk in the Belgian banking system," Working Paper Research 43, National Bank of Belgium.
  6. Guillermo A. Calvo & Enrique G. Mendoza, 1999. "Regional Contagion and the Globalization of Securities Markets," NBER Working Papers 7153, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. T. Todd Smith & Garry J. Schinasi, 1999. "Portfolio Diversification, Leverage, and Financial Contagion," IMF Working Papers 99/136, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Albert S. Kyle, 2001. "Contagion as a Wealth Effect," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(4), pages 1401-1440, 08.
  9. Furfine, Craig H, 2003. " Interbank Exposures: Quantifying the Risk of Contagion," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(1), pages 111-28, February.
  10. Upper, Christian & Worms, Andreas, 2004. "Estimating bilateral exposures in the German interbank market: Is there a danger of contagion?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 827-849, August.
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