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Homework assignment and student achievement in OECD countries

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  • Torberg Falch

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Marte Rønning

Abstract

By using data from 16 OECD countries who participated in TIMSS 2007, this paper analyzes the effect of assigning homework on student achievement. The identification rests on within-student variation in homework across subjects in a sample of students who have the same teacher in both mathematics and science. Unobserved teacher and student characteristics are conditioned out of the model by applying a difference-in-difference approach. We find a modest, but statistically significant effect of homework.

Suggested Citation

  • Torberg Falch & Marte Rønning, 2011. "Homework assignment and student achievement in OECD countries," Working Paper Series 11411, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:11411
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    File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2011/5_homework.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Heller-Sahlgren, Gabriel, 2018. "Smart but unhappy: Independent-school competition and the wellbeing-efficiency trade-off in education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 66-81.
    2. Tatiana Khavenson & Yulia Tyumeneva, 2012. "Teacher Characteristics and Student Achievements in TIMSS. Findings Gained from Applying the "First-Difference" Method to TIMSS-2007 Data," HSE Working papers WP BRP 06/EDU/2012, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    3. Wuttiporn Suamuang & Surachai Suksakulchai & Matthew A. Easter, 2018. "Relationship between Gender, Year Levels, Assignment Completion and Academic Achievement for College Students," Working papers 015WS, Research Association for Interdisciplinary Studies.
    4. Constantin Mang, 2016. "Market Consequences of ICT Innovations," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 70, November.
    5. Carlos Cortinhas, 2017. "Does formative feedback help or hinder students? An empirical investigation," Discussion Papers 1701, University of Exeter, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare

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