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Export Barriers: What Are They and Who Do They Matter To?

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  • Richard Kneller,
  • Mauro Pisu

Abstract

The recent literature on firm exporting behaviour has established that both sunk-cost of exports and firm characteristics, such as size and productivity matter. In this paper we provide fresh evidence on the actual barriers to exporting firms face and how they vary with export experience and other firm-level characteristics. Our results indicate that the higher the export experience of firms the lower are trade costs. These barriers are not related to other firms-level characteristics such as, productivity and size, found by the literature to be associated with export market entry. Overall, these results suggest the existence of a process of learning to export whereby firms learn how to cope with export barriers through direct experience in export markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Kneller, & Mauro Pisu, "undated". "Export Barriers: What Are They and Who Do They Matter To?," Discussion Papers 07/12, University of Nottingham, GEP.
  • Handle: RePEc:not:notgep:07/12
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    File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gep/documents/papers/2007/07-12.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lejour, Arjan & Rojas Romasgosa, Hugo & Rodriguez, Victor & Montalvo, Carvos & Van der Zee, Frans, 2009. "Trade costs, Openness and Productivity: Market Access at Home and Abroad," MPRA Paper 21214, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Halldin, Torbjörn, 2012. "External finance, collateralizable assets and export market entry," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 268, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    3. Volpe Martincus, Christian & Carballo, Jerónimo, 2010. "Beyond the average effects: The distributional impacts of export promotion programs in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 201-214, July.
    4. Eduardo Fernández-Arias & Eduardo Levy-Yeyati, 2012. "Global Financial Safety Nets: Where Do We Go from Here?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, pages 37-68.

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