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Where Are the Jobs? Estimating Skill-based Employment Linkages across Sectors for the Indian Economy: An Input-Output Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Bornali Bhandari
  • Tulika Bhattacharya

    (National Council of Applied Economic Research)

Abstract

The Economic Surveys (2014–15 and 2015–16) have, over the years, stressed on the need to create jobs to meet the needs of a burgeoning population. However, the question as to which sector has the most potential to create jobs and at what level have often been left unanswered. The objective of this paper is to identify the sectors of the Indian economy that are able to generate different types of skilled employment, both directly as well indirectly, by estimating their employment linkage effects with varying levels of skills using the Input– Output technique. The contribution of this paper is that it re-defines skills by combining three types of education, including general, vocational and technical education, and thus defines four types of skilled employment categories—low skilled, low-medium skilled, medium-high skilled, and high skilled employment. The paper incorporates these four types of skilled employment within the Input–Output framework, using the World Input–Output Database (WIOD), and estimates the forward and backward linkage effects related to employment with respect to four different skill types for India. The estimation of these employment linkage effects is critical to identify the key employment-generating sectors in the Indian economy with varying levels of skill. The study also urges policymakers to boost some select sectors in order to enhance different types of employment, thus proposing a way to take forward the ‘Skill India Mission’.

Suggested Citation

  • Bornali Bhandari & Tulika Bhattacharya, 2021. "Where Are the Jobs? Estimating Skill-based Employment Linkages across Sectors for the Indian Economy: An Input-Output Analysis," NCAER Working Papers 120, National Council of Applied Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:nca:ncaerw:120
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    Cited by:

    1. Ujjaini Mukhopadhyay, 2021. "Differential Education Subsidy Policy and Wage Inequality Between Skilled, Semi-skilled and Unskilled Labour: A General Equilibrium Approach," Review of Development and Change, , vol. 26(1), pages 40-62, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment; India; Jobs; Input-output model; Skills;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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