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Do CCTs Improve Employment and Earnings in the Very Long-Term? Evidence from Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • Adriana D. Kugler
  • Ingrid Rojas

Abstract

We assess long-term impacts of the Mexican conditional cash transfer (CCT) program on youth employment and earnings. We rely on the original random assignment into early and late treatment localities, which introduced CCTs in 1998 and 2000. We focus on children between 7 and 16 years of age in 1997, who we follow up to 17 years later. Using the household surveys between 2003 and 2015, we find that those with greater time of exposure to CCTs had greater increases in educational attainment. Moreover, we find significant and positive impacts of the program on the likelihood and quality of employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Adriana D. Kugler & Ingrid Rojas, 2018. "Do CCTs Improve Employment and Earnings in the Very Long-Term? Evidence from Mexico," NBER Working Papers 24248, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24248
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    1. repec:spr:izamig:v:8:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-018-0131-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Paredes, Tatiana, 2017. "The long-term effects of cash transfers on education and labor market outcomes," MPRA Paper 88809, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 03 Sep 2018.
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:123:y:2019:i:c:10 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Barham, Tania & Macours, Karen & Maluccio, John, 2018. "Experimental Evidence of Exposure to a Conditional Cash Transfer During Early Teenage Years: Young Women's Fertility and Labor Market Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 13165, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Sarah Baird & David McKenzie & Berk Özler, 2018. "The effects of cash transfers on adult labor market outcomes," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 1-20, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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