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Estimating the Economic Impacts of Living Wage Mandates Using Ex Ante Simulations, Longitudinal Estimates, and New Public and Administrative Data: Evidence for New York City

Author

Listed:
  • David Neumark
  • Matthew Thompson
  • Francesco Brindisi
  • Leslie Koyle
  • Clayton Reck

Abstract

Policy researchers often have to estimate the future effect of imposing a policy in a particular location. There is often historical information on the effects of similar policies in other jurisdictions, but no information on the effects of the policy in the jurisdiction in question, and the policy may have specific features not reflected in the experiences of other areas. It is then necessary to combine the historical evidence from other locations with information and data specific to the jurisdiction in question. In this paper, we illustrate and use this approach in estimating the impact of a proposed living wage mandate for New York City. We explain how we combined elements of "ex ante" evaluations of living wage laws with before-and-after (longitudinal) estimates of the effects of living wage laws. We also incorporate detailed location-specific information on workers, families, and employers using administrative data and other new public data sources.

Suggested Citation

  • David Neumark & Matthew Thompson & Francesco Brindisi & Leslie Koyle & Clayton Reck, 2012. "Estimating the Economic Impacts of Living Wage Mandates Using Ex Ante Simulations, Longitudinal Estimates, and New Public and Administrative Data: Evidence for New York City," NBER Working Papers 18055, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18055 Note: LS
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ximing Wu & Jeffrey M. Perloff & Amos Golan, 2006. "Effects Of Government Policies On Urban And Rural Income Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 52(2), pages 213-235, June.
    2. David Neumark & William L. Wascher, 2008. "Minimum Wages," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262141027, January.
    3. David Neumark & Mark Schweitzer & William Wascher, 2005. "The Effects of Minimum Wages on the Distribution of Family Incomes: A Nonparametric Analysis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(4), pages 867-894.
    4. Bénédicte Vidaillet & V. D'Estaintot & P. Abécassis, 2005. "Introduction," Post-Print hal-00287137, HAL.
    5. Rebecca M. Blank, 2002. "Evaluating Welfare Reform in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1105-1166, December.
    6. David Fairris & Leon Fernandez Bujanda, 2008. "The Dissipation of Minimum Wage Gains for Workers through Labor-Labor Substitution: Evidence from the Los Angeles Living Wage Ordinance," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 473-496, October.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy

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