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Children Left Behind: The Effects of Statewide Job Loss on Student Achievement

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Listed:
  • Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat
  • Anna Gassman-Pines
  • Dania V. Francis
  • Christina M. Gibson-Davis

Abstract

We examine effects of state-level job losses on student achievement. Losses to 1% of the working-age population decrease eighth-grade math scores by .076 standard deviations, with consistently negative but less precise effects on eighth-grade reading and on fourth-grade math and reading. Effects are 34 times larger than found when comparing students with displaced parents to otherwise similar students, suggesting that downturns affect all students, not just those whose parents lose employment. Evidence is inconsistent with a "downward spiral of behavior" or reduced school funding as causal mechanisms; rather, reduced income and increased distress likely inhibit performance. States experiencing displacement of 1% of workers likely see an 8% increase in schools missing No Child Left Behind requirements.

Suggested Citation

  • Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat & Anna Gassman-Pines & Dania V. Francis & Christina M. Gibson-Davis, 2011. "Children Left Behind: The Effects of Statewide Job Loss on Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 17104, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17104
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17104.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ochsen, Carsten, 2008. "Subjective well-being and the duration of aggregate unemployment in Europe," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 97, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff, 2014. "The Effects of the Great Recession on Teenagers' Risky Health Behaviors and Time Use," IZA Discussion Papers 8204, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Jessamyn Schaller & Mariana Zerpa, 2015. "Short-run Effects of Parental Job Loss on Child Health," NBER Working Papers 21745, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Elizabeth Ananat & Anna Gassman-Pines & Christina M. Gibson-Davis, 2013. "Community-Wide Job Loss and Teenage Fertility," NBER Working Papers 19003, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11150-015-9297-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Elizabeth Ananat & Anna Gassman-Pines & Christina Gibson-Davis, 2013. "Community-Wide Job Loss and Teenage Fertility: Evidence From North Carolina," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(6), pages 2151-2171, December.
    6. William Darity, 2013. "From Here to Full Employment," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 115-120, June.
    7. Li Hao & Daniel Houser, 2012. "Belief elicitation in the presence of naïve respondents: An experimental study," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 161-180, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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