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The Complementarity between Cities and Skills

Author

Listed:
  • Edward L. Glaeser
  • Matthew G. Resseger

Abstract

There is a strong connection between per worker productivity and metropolitan area population, which is commonly interpreted as evidence for the existence of agglomeration economies. This correlation is particularly strong in cities with higher levels of skill and virtually non-existent in less skilled metropolitan areas. This fact is particularly compatible with the view that urban density is important because proximity spreads knowledge, which either makes workers more skilled or entrepreneurs more productive. Bigger cities certainly attract more skilled workers, and there is some evidence suggesting that human capital accumulates more quickly in urban areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew G. Resseger, 2009. "The Complementarity between Cities and Skills," NBER Working Papers 15103, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15103
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w15103.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Casey Dougal & Christopher A. Parsons & Sheridan Titman, 2014. "Urban Vibrancy and Corporate Growth," NBER Working Papers 20350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Guy Michaels & Ferdinand Rauch & Stephen J. Redding, 2013. "Task Specialization in U.S. Cities from 1880-2000," CEP Discussion Papers dp1186, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Edyta Laszkiewicz, 2016. "Determinants Of Hourly Wages Inequality In Selected European Metropolises. The Results From The Multilevel Modelling," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 11(4), pages 853-869, December.
    4. repec:wsi:afexxx:v:10:y:2015:i:01:n:s2010495215500074 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Bruno Chiarini & Elisabetta Marzano, 2014. "Urbanization and Growth: Why Did the Splendor of the Italian Cities in the Sixteenth Century not Lead to Transition?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5038, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D0 - Microeconomics - - General
    • R0 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General

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