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Information Diffusion Effects in Individual Investors' Common Stock Purchases Covet Thy Neighbors' Investment Choices

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  • Zoran Ivkovich
  • Scott Weisbenner

Abstract

We study the relation between households' stock purchases and stock purchases made by their neighbors. A ten percentage point increase in neighbors' purchases of stocks from an industry is associated with a two percentage point increase in households' own purchases of stocks from that industry. The effect is considerably larger for local stocks and among households in more social states. Controlling for area sociability, households' and neighbors' investment style preferences, and the industry composition of local firms, we attribute approximately one-quarter to one-half of the correlation between households' stock purchases and stock purchases made by their neighbors to word-of-mouth communication.

Suggested Citation

  • Zoran Ivkovich & Scott Weisbenner, 2007. "Information Diffusion Effects in Individual Investors' Common Stock Purchases Covet Thy Neighbors' Investment Choices," NBER Working Papers 13201, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13201
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    Cited by:

    1. James J. Choi & David Laibson & Brigitte C. Madrian & Andrew Metrick, 2009. "Reinforcement Learning and Savings Behavior," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(6), pages 2515-2534, December.
    2. Vasyl Golosnoy & Nestor Parolya, 2017. "‘To have what they are having’: portfolio choice for mimicking mean–variance savers," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(11), pages 1645-1653, November.
    3. Brown, Sarah & Taylor, Karl, 2014. "Household finances and the ‘Big Five’ personality traits," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 197-212.
    4. repec:eee:ecmode:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:74-81 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:finmar:v:35:y:2017:i:c:p:65-83 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Abreu, Margarida & Mendes, Victor, 2012. "Information, overconfidence and trading: Do the sources of information matter?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 868-881.
    7. Isaac Ehrlich & Jong Kook Shin & Yong Yin, 2011. "Private Information, Human Capital, and Optimal "Home Bias" in Financial Markets," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(3), pages 255-301.
    8. repec:eee:jeborg:v:140:y:2017:i:c:p:197-223 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. García, Diego & Norli, Øyvind, 2012. "Geographic dispersion and stock returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(3), pages 547-565.
    10. Oechssler, Jörg & Schmidt, Carsten & Schnedler, Wendelin, 2011. "On the ingredients for bubble formation: Informed traders and communication," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 1831-1851.
    11. repec:eee:finlet:v:22:y:2017:i:c:p:197-201 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Agarwal, Sumit & Chomsisengphet, Souphala & Zhang, Yunqi, 2017. "How does working in a finance profession affect mortgage delinquency?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 1-13.
    13. Hayley, Simon & Marsh, Ian W., 2016. "What do retail FX traders learn?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 16-38.
    14. Chuang, Hongwei, 2016. "Brokers’ financial network and stock return," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 172-183.
    15. Halim, Edward & Riyanto, Yohanes Eko & Roy, Nilanjan, 2017. "Costly Information Acquisition, Social Networks and Asset Prices: Experimental Evidence," MPRA Paper 80658, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Knüpfer, Samuli & Rantapuska, Elias & Sarvimäki, Matti, 2017. "Why does portfolio choice correlate across generations," Research Discussion Papers 25/2017, Bank of Finland.
    17. Heimer, Rawley & Simon, David, 2015. "Facebook Finance: How Social Interaction Propagates Active Investing," Working Paper 1522, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    18. El Ghoul, Sadok & Zheng, Xiaolan, 2016. "Trade credit provision and national culture," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 475-501.
    19. Zhang, Yongjie & An, Yahui & Feng, Xu & Jin, Xi, 2017. "Celebrities and ordinaries in social networks: Who knows more information?," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 153-161.
    20. Hirshleifer, David & Teoh, Siew Hong, 2008. "Thought and Behavior Contagion in Capital Markets," MPRA Paper 9164, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Li-Xin Wang, 2016. "Modeling Stock Price Dynamics with Fuzzy Opinion Networks," Papers 1602.06213, arXiv.org.
    22. Booth, G. Geoffrey & Gurun, Umit G. & Zhang, Harold, 2014. "Financial networks and trading in bond markets," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 126-157.
    23. Liang, Pinghan & Guo, Shiqi, 2015. "Social interaction, Internet access and stock market participation—An empirical study in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 883-901.
    24. Luo, Mancy, 2017. "Essays in financial intermediation and political economy," Other publications TiSEM 146f40d3-6c89-4c6d-8fea-1, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    25. Andersen, Steffen & Hanspal, Tobin & Nielsen, Kasper Meisner, 2016. "Once Bitten, Twice Shy: The Role of Inertia and Personal Experiences in Risk Taking," CEPR Discussion Papers 11504, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

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