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The LM Curve: A Not-So-Fond Farewell

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  • Benjamin Friedman

Abstract

One of the most significant changes in monetary economics in recent years has been the virtual disappearance of what was once a dominant focus on money, and in parallel the disappearance of the LM curve as part of the analytical framework that economists use to think about issues of monetary policy. Today's standard workhorse model consists of an aggregate demand (or IS) curve and an aggregate supply (or price setting) curve, with the system closed when appropriate by an equation that represents monetary policy by relating the nominal interest rate to variables like output and inflation, but typically not either the quantity or the growth rate of money. This change in the standard analytics is an understandable reflection of how most central banks now make monetary policy: by setting a short-term nominal interest rate, with little if any explicit role for money.' But the disappearance of the LM curve has also left two lacunae in how economists think about monetary policy. Without the LM curve it is more difficult to take into account how the functioning of the banking system, and with it the credit markets more generally, matter for monetary policy. Abandoning the role of money and the analytics of the LM curve also leaves open the underlying question of how the central bank manages to fix the chosen interest rate in the first place.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Friedman, 2003. "The LM Curve: A Not-So-Fond Farewell," NBER Working Papers 10123, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10123 Note: ME
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    Cited by:

    1. Joerg Bibow, 2004. "Fiscal Consolidation Contrasting Strategies & Lessons from International Experience," Macroeconomics 0402014, EconWPA.
    2. Patrick Minford & Naveen Srinivasan, 2011. "Determinacy in New Keynesian Models: A Role for Money after All?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(2), pages 211-229, June.
    3. Patrick Minford & Naveen Srinivasan, 2015. "Can the Learnability Criterion Ensure Determinacy in New Keynesian Models?," South Asian Journal of Macroeconomics and Public Finance, , vol. 4(1), pages 43-61, June.
    4. Douglas Laxton & Andrew Berg & Philippe D Karam, 2006. "A Practical Model-Based Approach to Monetary Policy Analysis—Overview," IMF Working Papers 06/80, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Nachane, D.M. & Dubey, Amlendu Kumar, 2011. "The vanishing role of money in the macro-economy: An empirical investigation for India," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 859-869, May.
    6. Suneetha M. S., 2014. "Perspectives on Valuation of Biodiversity," Working Papers 2014-088, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
    7. Meixing DAI, 2009. "On the role of money growth targeting under inflation targeting regime," Working Papers of BETA 2009-11, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    8. César Carrera, 2016. "Long-run Money Demand in Latin American Countries: A Nonstationary Panel Data Approach," Monetaria, Centro de Estudios Monetarios Latinoamericanos, vol. 0(1), pages 121-152, January-j.
    9. Dai, Meixing, 2011. "Financial market imperfections and monetary policy strategy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2609-2621.
    10. Philip Arestis & Georgios Chortareas & John D. Tsoukalas, 2010. "Money and Information in a New Neoclassical Synthesis Framework," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(542), pages 101-128, February.
    11. Songcheng Sheng & Peixin Wu, 2009. "The binary transmission mechanism of China’s monetary policy—A research on the “two intermediaries, two targets” model," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, pages 335-360.
    12. Dai, Meixing, 2003. "Une note sur la règle du taux d’intérêt et le rôle de la courbe LM
      [A note on the interest rate rule and the role of LM curve]
      ," MPRA Paper 13779, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2009.
    13. Dai, Meixing, 2007. "The design of a ‘two-pillar’ monetary policy strategy," MPRA Paper 14403, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2009.

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    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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