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Does the Investment Interest Limitation Explain the Existence of Dividends?

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  • Daniel R. Feenberg

Abstract

Miller and Scholes show that under certain conditions the Federal Income tax taxes dividend income at a rate no higher than the rate on capital gains. Tabulations of actual 1977 tax returns show that the special circumstances under which this can occur apply to less than 3% of dividend income and no significant role can be ascribed to their result in the determination of corporate dividend policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel R. Feenberg, 1980. "Does the Investment Interest Limitation Explain the Existence of Dividends?," NBER Working Papers 0530, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:0530
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    Cited by:

    1. James M. Poterba, 1986. "Explaining the Yield Spread between Taxable and Tax-exempt Bonds: The Role of Expected Tax Policy," NBER Chapters,in: Studies in State and Local Public Finance, pages 5-52 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. James M. Poterba, 1984. "Expected Future Tax Policy and Tax Exempt Bond Yields," Working papers 350, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    3. Poterba, James M., 2002. "Taxation, risk-taking, and household portfolio behavior," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 17, pages 1109-1171 Elsevier.
    4. Mihir A. Desai & C. Fritz Foley & James R. Hines Jr., 2002. "Dividend Policy inside the Firm," NBER Working Papers 8698, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Poterba, James M & Summers, Lawrence H, 1984. " New Evidence that Taxes Affect the Valuation of Dividends," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 39(5), pages 1397-1415, December.
    6. James M. Poterba, 1986. "How Burdensome Are Capital Gains Taxes?," Working papers 410, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    7. Jongmoo Jay Choi & Frank J. Fabozzi & Uzi Yaari, 1989. "Optimum Corporate Leverage With Risky Debt: A Demand Approach," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 12(2), pages 129-142, June.
    8. Paul Grier & Paul Strebel, 1983. "An Implicit Clientele Test Of The Relationship Between Taxation And Capital Structure," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 6(2), pages 163-174, June.
    9. Poterba, James M., 1989. "Tax reform and the market for tax-exempt debt," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 537-562, August.
    10. Robert L. McDonald & Naomi Soderstrom, 1986. "Dividend and Share Changes: Is There a Financing Hierarchy?," NBER Working Papers 2029, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Jean-François Malécot, 1990. "Hypothèses de profit permanent et d'anticipations rationnelles. Une nouvelle modélisation des politiques de versement de dividendes," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 41(4), pages 713-730.
    12. Randall Morck, 2003. "Why Some Double Taxation Might Make Sense: The Special Case of Inter-corporate Dividends," NBER Working Papers 9651, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. James M. Poterba & Lawrence H. Summers, 1984. "The Economic Effects of Dividend Taxation," Working papers 343, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    14. Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1986. "The General Theory of Tax Avoidance," NBER Working Papers 1868, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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