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Tax, Credit Constraints, and the Big Costs of Small Inflation

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  • Andrew Coleman

    () (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

Abstract

This paper develops an overlapping generations model incorporating credit constraints, owner-occupier and rental sectors, and detailed tax regulations to examine how the interaction of inflation and the tax system affect the housing market. It shows that even modest rates of inflation can have very large effects on the home-ownership rates of young households, particularly at low real interest rates. This occurs even if there is a large supply response in the quantity of housing. The model suggests that the welfare costs of inflation could be ameliorated by exempting the inflation component of interest payments from income tax.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Coleman, 2008. "Tax, Credit Constraints, and the Big Costs of Small Inflation," Working Papers 08_14, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:08_14
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    File URL: http://motu-www.motu.org.nz/wpapers/08_14.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aaron, Henry J, 1976. "Inflation and the Income Tax," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 193-199, May.
    2. Modigliani, Franco., 1974. "Some economic implications of the indexing of financial assets with special reference to mortgages," Working papers 736-74., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    3. Kearl, J R, 1979. "Inflation, Mortgages, and Housing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 1115-1138, October.
    4. Fumio Hayashi & Takatoshi Ito & Joel Slemrod, 1987. "Housing Finance Imperfections and Private Saving: A Comparative Simulation Analysis of the U.S. and Japan," NBER Working Papers 2272, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Roger H. Gordon & James R. Hines, Jr. & Lawrence H. Summers, 1987. "Notes on the Tax Treatment of Structures," NBER Chapters, in: The Effects of Taxation on Capital Accumulation, pages 223-258, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Martin S. Feldstein, 1999. "Capital Income Taxes and the Benefit of Price Stability," NBER Chapters, in: The Costs and Benefits of Price Stability, pages 9-46, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Nowotny, Ewald, 1980. "Inflation and Taxation: Reviewing the Macroeconomic Issues," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 1025-1049, September.
    8. Fischer, Stanley & Summers, Lawrence H, 1989. "Should Governments Learn to Live with Inflation?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 382-387, May.
    9. Martin S. Feldstein, 1997. "The Costs and Benefits of Going from Low Inflation to Price Stability," NBER Chapters, in: Reducing Inflation: Motivation and Strategy, pages 123-166, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Bailey, Martin J, 1974. "Progressivity and Investment Yields under U.S. Income Taxation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1157-1175, Nov.-Dec..
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Coleman, 2017. "Housing, the ‘Great Income Tax Experiment’, and the intergenerational consequences of the lease," Working Papers 17_09, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    2. Andrew Coleman, 2010. "The long-term effects of capital gains taxes in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(2), pages 159-177.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation; credit constraints; capital income taxes; housing markets; home-ownership rates; monetary policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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