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The Economic Status of Elderly Divorced Women


  • Steven J. Haider

    (Michigan State University)

  • Alison Jacknowitz


  • Robert F. Schoeni

    (University of Michigan)


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven J. Haider & Alison Jacknowitz & Robert F. Schoeni, 2003. "The Economic Status of Elderly Divorced Women," Working Papers wp046, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrr:papers:wp046

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alan J. Auerbach & Laurence J. Kotlikoff, 1985. "Life Insurance of the Elderly: Adequacy and Determinants," NBER Working Papers 1737, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Thomas L. Hungerford, 2002. "The Persistence of Hardship Over the Life Course," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_367, Levy Economics Institute.
    3. Ono, Hiromi & Stafford, Frank, 2001. " Till Death Do Us Part or I Get My Pension? Wives' Pension Holding and Marital Dissolution in the United States," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 103(3), pages 525-544, September.
    4. Greg J. Duncan & Saul D. Hoffman, 1985. "Economic Consequences of Marital Instability," NBER Chapters,in: Horizontal Equity, Uncertainty, and Economic Well-Being, pages 427-470 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Timothy M. Smeeding, 1999. "Social Security Reform: Improving Benefit Adequacy and Economic Security for Women," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 16, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    6. Michael D. Hurd & Daniel McFadden & Harish Chand & Li Gan & Angela Menill & Michael Roberts, 1998. "Consumption and Savings Balances of the Elderly: Experimental Evidence on Survey Response Bias," NBER Chapters,in: Frontiers in the Economics of Aging, pages 353-392 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Tamborini & Howard Iams & Gayle Reznik, 2012. "Women’s Earnings Before and After Marital Dissolution: Evidence from Longitudinal Earnings Records Matched to Survey Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 69-82, March.
    2. Kristin Mammen, 2008. "The Long-Term Effects of the Divorce Revolution: Health, Wealth, and Labor Supply," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2008-22, Center for Retirement Research, revised Nov 2008.
    3. Maria Letizia Zanier & Isabella Crespi, 2015. "Facing the Gender Gap in Aging: Italian Women’s Pension in the European Context," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-22, November.

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