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Satisfied Workers, Retained Workers: Effects of Work and Work Environment on Homecare Workers' Job Satisfaction, Stress, Physical Health, and Retention

Author

Listed:
  • Isik U. Zeytinoglu
  • Margaret Denton

Abstract

The goal of this project was to assist health system managers and policy makers develop policies and strategies to recruit and retain human resources in the homecare sector and have a satisfied, healthy workforce. The overall research question was: How do the work characteristics of homecare workers and the work environment in homecare contribute to job satisfaction, stress, physical health, and retention? The research is designed as a mixed-method approach with both qualitative and quantitative data. Results showed that restructuring and organizational change in the homecare sector has contributed to both mental and physical health problems (including job stress and musculoskeletal disorders), job dissatisfaction, and retention problems. Factors that contribute to higher levels of satisfaction and the propensity to stay with the organization include organizational and peer support, working one-on-one with clients, doing emotional labour (that is, the work involved in dealing with other people’s feelings), and satisfaction with schedules, pay, and benefits. This study also examined the association between job flexibility and job insecurity and self-reported musculoskeletal disorders and found no relationship between these variables and musculoskeletal disorders.

Suggested Citation

  • Isik U. Zeytinoglu & Margaret Denton, 2006. "Satisfied Workers, Retained Workers: Effects of Work and Work Environment on Homecare Workers' Job Satisfaction, Stress, Physical Health, and Retention," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 412, McMaster University.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcm:qseprr:412
    as

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    File URL: http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/qsep/p/qsep412.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Frank T Denton & Christine H Feaver & Byron G Spencer, 2005. "Population Aging in Canada: Software for Exploring the Implications for the Labour Force and the Productive Capacity of the Economy," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 146, McMaster University.
    2. Candace L. Kemp & Carolyn J. Rosenthal & Margaret Denton, 2004. "Financial Planning for Later Life: Subjective Understandings of Catalysts and Constraints," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 118, McMaster University.
    3. Candace L. Kemp & Carolyn J. Rosenthal & Margaret Denton, 2004. "Financial Planning for Later Life: Subjective Understandings of Catalysts and Constraints," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 389, McMaster University.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    home care workers; job satisfaction; retention;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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