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Relative Wage Positions and Quit Behavior: New Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data

Author

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  • Christian Pfeifer

    () (Institute of Economics, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany)

  • Stefan Schneck

    () (Institute of Empirical Economic Research, Leibniz Universität Hannover)

Abstract

We use a large linked employer-employee data set to analyze the importance of relative wage positions in the context of individual quit decisions as an inverse measure of job satisfaction. Our main findings are: (1) Workers with higher relative wage positions within their firms are on average more likely to quit their jobs than workers with lower relative wage positions; and (2) workers, who experience a loss in their relative wage positions, are also more likely to have a wage cut associated with their job-to-job transition. The overall results therefore suggest that the status effect is dominated by an opposing signal effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Pfeifer & Stefan Schneck, 2010. "Relative Wage Positions and Quit Behavior: New Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data," Working Paper Series in Economics 163, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lue:wpaper:163
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Schneck, Stefan, 2014. "My Wage is Unfair! Just a Feeling or Comparison with Peers?," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 245-273.
    2. Stefan Schneck, 2011. "The Effect of Relative Standing on Considerations about Self-Employment," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 426, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Sami Miaari & Asaf Zussman & Noam Zussman, 2012. "Ethnic conflict and job separations," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 419-437, January.
    4. Gerlach, Knut & Hübler, Olaf & Stephan, Gesine, 2011. "Beschäftigung zwischen Mobilität und Stabilität : empirische Befunde und wirtschaftspolitische Folgerungen," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 44(1/2), pages 91-102.
    5. Wagner, Robert & Zwick, Thomas, 2012. "How acid are lemons? Adverse selection and signalling for skilled labour market entrants," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-014, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    6. Arndt Werner & Johanna Gast & Sascha Kraus, 2014. "The effect of working time preferences and fair wage perceptions on entrepreneurial intentions among employees," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 137-160, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    comparison income; mobility; signaling; status; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • M52 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Compensation and Compensation Methods and Their Effects

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