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The Burden Of Aging: Much Ado About Nothing, Or Little To Do About Something?


  • L. Randall Wray


Demographers and economists agree that we are aging--individually and collectively, nationally and globally. An aging population results from the twin demographic forces of fewer children per family and longer lives. Most experts recognize the burden that aging causes as the number of retirees supported by each worker rises. This trend is reinforced by the graying of the baby-boom generation, but burdens will continue to rise even after the boomers are buried--albeit at a slower pace.

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  • L. Randall Wray, 2006. "The Burden Of Aging: Much Ado About Nothing, Or Little To Do About Something?," Economics Policy Note Archive 06-5, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:levypn:06-5

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ronald Lee & Timothy Miller & Michael Anderson, 2004. "Stochastic Infinite Horizon Forecasts for Social Security and Related Studies," NBER Working Papers 10917, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Dimitri B. Papadimitriou & L. Randall Wray, "undated". "Does Social Security Need Saving? Providing for Retirees throughout the Twenty-first Century," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_55, Levy Economics Institute.
    3. Marc-Andre Pigeon & L. Randall Wray, "undated". "Down and Out in the United States, An Inside Look at the Out of the Labor Force Population," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_54, Levy Economics Institute.
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