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Exploring Cross-Country Variation in Government Shares: What Can We Learn from Relative Productivities?

Author

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  • Maksym Obrizan

    () (Kyiv School of Economics, Kyiv Economics Institute)

Abstract

Government shares in total output are characterized by significant variation across countries. As a starting point of my study, I notice strong negative correlation between government consumption share and price of government services in terms of private consumption. Motivated by this empirical observation, I develop a neoclassical growth model with added government that is capable of matching the variation in government shares very closely using only relative prices. In addition, I provide empirical evidence showing that the relative price of government consumption increases in income which is consistent with distortions prevailing in poor countries. These two observations combined imply that government shares tend to be higher in poorer countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Maksym Obrizan, 2010. "Exploring Cross-Country Variation in Government Shares: What Can We Learn from Relative Productivities?," Discussion Papers 25, Kyiv School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kse:dpaper:25
    Note: Submitted to Macroeconomic Dynamics
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    File URL: http://repec.kse.org.ua/pdf/KSE_dp25.pdf
    File Function: May 2010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Easterly, William & Rebelo, Sergio, 1993. "Fiscal policy and economic growth: An empirical investigation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 417-458, December.
    2. Ram, Rati, 1986. "Government Size and Economic Growth: A New Framework and Some Evidencefrom Cross-Section and Time-Series Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 191-203, March.
    3. Mueller,Dennis C., 2003. "Public Choice III," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521894753, May.
    4. Restuccia, Diego & Urrutia, Carlos, 2001. "Relative prices and investment rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 93-121, February.
    5. Chang-Tai Hsieh & Peter J. Klenow, 2007. "Relative Prices and Relative Prosperity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 562-585, June.
    6. Meltzer, Allan H & Richard, Scott F, 1981. "A Rational Theory of the Size of Government," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 914-927, October.
    7. Robert Summers & Alan Heston, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950–1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-368.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2014. "National and International Inequalities in Income and Wealth in a Global Growth with Free Trade and National Inflation Policies," Global Economic Observer, "Nicolae Titulescu" University of Bucharest, Faculty of Economic Sciences;Institute for World Economy of the Romanian Academy, vol. 2(1), pages 22-40, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government consumption; Relative government shares; Relative international prices; Neoclassical growth model; the Penn World Table;

    JEL classification:

    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • H40 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - General
    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical

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