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The Regional Dimension of Sectoral Innovativeness An Empirical Investigation of Two Specialised Supplier and Two Science-Based Industries


  • Uwe Cantner

    () (School of Economics and Business Administration, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena)

  • Matthias Bürger

    () (Department of Economics and Business Administration, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena and Graduate College "The Economics of Innovative Change" (DFG-GK-1411))


The aim of this paper is to test how geographical and technological proximity relate to a particular industry's innovative output. Two mechanisms are therefore tested, i.e. agglomeration economies and the regional exploitation of technological proximity. A new dataset is applied, which includes German patent applications from within the period 1995 to 2006. Four industries are considered, two of which are science-based, whereas the remaining two are specialised supplier industries. While diversity is associated with high innovative output in the specialised supplier industries, the results for specialisation are mixed. However, all industries seem to benefit, at least to a certain degree, from the regional re-combination of their own technologies with those of specific key industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Uwe Cantner & Matthias Bürger, 2010. "The Regional Dimension of Sectoral Innovativeness An Empirical Investigation of Two Specialised Supplier and Two Science-Based Industries," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-032, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2010-032

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    Cited by:

    1. Uwe Cantner & Simone Vannuccini, 2012. "A New View of General Purpose Technologies," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-054, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    2. M. Capasso & E. Cefis & K. Frenken, 2010. "Spatial Differentiation In Industrial Dynamics: A Core-Periphery Analysis Based On The Pavitt-Miozzo-Soete Taxonomy," Working Papers 10-21, Utrecht School of Economics.
    3. Ron Boschma & Asier Minondo & Mikel Navarro, 2013. "The Emergence of New Industries at the Regional Level in S pain: A Proximity Approach Based on Product Relatedness," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 89(1), pages 29-51, January.
    4. Feldman, Maryann & Tavassoli, Sam, 2014. "Something New: Where do new industries come from?," Working Papers 2014/02, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Economics.
    5. M. Hartog & R. Boschma & M. Sotarauta, 2012. "The Impact of Related Variety on Regional Employment Growth in Finland 1993--2006: High-Tech versus Medium/Low-Tech," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(6), pages 459-476, August.
    6. Ning, Lutao & Wang, Fan & Li, Jian, 2016. "Urban innovation, regional externalities of foreign direct investment and industrial agglomeration: Evidence from Chinese cities," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 830-843.
    7. Pessoa, Argentino, 2012. "Regional cluster policy: The Asian model vs. the OECD approach," MPRA Paper 42024, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    Innovation; Proximity; Diversity;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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