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Central bank intervention and exchange rate behaviour : empirical evidence for India

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Abstract

This paper examines the causal relationship between central bank intervention and exchange returns in India. Using monthly data from December 1997 to December 2011, the empirical results derived from the CCF approach of Cheung and Ng (1996) suggest that there is causality-in-variance from exchange rate returns to central bank intervention, but not vice versa. These findings are robust in the sense that they hold in cases where the returns were measured from either the spot rate or the forward rate. Therefore, the results of this paper suggest that the Indian central bank has intervened in the foreign exchange market to respond to exchange rate volatility, although the volatility has not been influenced by central bank intervention in the form of net purchases of foreign currency in the market.

Suggested Citation

  • Inoue, Takeshi, 2012. "Central bank intervention and exchange rate behaviour : empirical evidence for India," IDE Discussion Papers 353, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper353
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    1. Goyal, Ashima & Arora, Sanchit, 2012. "The Indian exchange rate and Central Bank action: An EGARCH analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 60-72.
    2. Hong, Yongmiao, 2001. "A test for volatility spillover with application to exchange rates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 103(1-2), pages 183-224, July.
    3. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Ng, Lilian K., 1996. "A causality-in-variance test and its application to financial market prices," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1-2), pages 33-48.
    4. Hung, Juann H, 1997. "Intervention strategies and exchange rate volatility: a noise trading perspective," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 779-793, September.
    5. Harendra Behera & Vathsala Narasimhan & K.N. Murty, 2008. "Relationship between Exchange Rate Volatility and Central Bank Intervention," South Asia Economic Journal, Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka, vol. 9(1), pages 69-84, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ghosh, Sunandan & Kundu, Srikanta, 2019. "Central Bank Intervention in Foreign Exchange Market under Managed Float: A Three Regime Threshold VAR Analysis of Indian Rupee-US Dollar Exchange Rate," MPRA Paper 93466, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    India; Foreign exchange; Exchange control; Central bank; Causality-in-variance; Exchange rate; Intervention;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

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