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Diffusion of cohabitation in Poland

Author

Listed:
  • Monika Mynarska

    (Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.)

  • Anna Matysiak

    (Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.)

Abstract

This paper attempts to establish the stage Poland has reached in the process of cohabitation diffusion, referring to the theoretical model of the process developed in demographic literature. Official statistics suggest that Poland is still in the first stage of cohabitation diffusion; however, our in-depth study of the process of first union formation challenges this view. We investigated cohabitation from a life-course perspective and analysed the meanings which are attached to this form of living arrangement. The results clearly indicate that Poland has already entered the second stage of cohabitation diffusion. We reached this conclusion on the basis of quantitative and qualitative data. This mixed-method approach allowed us to obtain empirical evidence from different sources and hence to formulate our conclusions with higher certainty (methodological triangulation). of the population.

Suggested Citation

  • Monika Mynarska & Anna Matysiak, 2010. "Diffusion of cohabitation in Poland," Working Papers 19, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isd:wpaper:19
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Baranowska-Rataj, 2014. "What Would Your Parents Say? The Impact of Cohabitation Among Young People on Their Relationships with Their Parents," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(6), pages 1313-1332, December.
    2. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Monika Mynarska & Daniele Vignoli, 2014. "A Dirty Look From The Neighbors. Does Living In A Religious Neighborhood Prevent Cohabitation?," Working Papers 71, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    3. Anna Baranowska-Rataj, 2012. "What would your parents say? The impact of cohabitation on intergenerational relations in traditional societies," Working Papers 50, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    4. Anna Baranowska, 2011. "Premarital conceptions and their resolution. The decomposition of trends in rural and urban areas in Poland 1985-2009," Working Papers 27, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    5. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Elena Pirani, 2013. "Will they turn back on you? The relations between young co habiting people and their parents," Working Papers 63, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    6. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak & Monika Mynarska, 2012. "Does Lone Motherhood Decrease Women’s Subjective Well-Being? Evidence from Qualitative and Quantitative Research," Working Papers 48, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    7. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak & Monika Mynarska, 2014. "Does Lone Motherhood Decrease Women’s Happiness? Evidence from Qualitative and Quantitative Research," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(6), pages 1457-1477, December.
    8. Monika Mynarska & Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2014. "Free to stay, free to leave: Insights from Poland into the meaning of cohabitation," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(36), pages 1107-1136.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cohabitation; cohabitation diffusion; first union formation; methodological triangulation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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