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Corruption in Cyclone Preparedness and Relief Efforts in Coastal Bangladesh: Lessons for Climate Adaptation?

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  • Mahmud, Tanvir
  • Prowse, Martin

Abstract

This article seeks to draw possible lessons for adaptation programmes in Bangladesh by examining whether Cyclone preparedness and relief interventions are subject to corrupt practices. Based on a random sample survey of 278 households, three focus-group discussions and seven key-informant interviews, the article investigates the nature and extent of corruption in pre- and post-disaster interventions in Khulna district before and after Cyclone Aila in May 2009. Ninety nine percent of households reported losses from corruption. Postdisaster interventions (such as food aid and public works schemes) suffered from greater levels, and worse types, of corruption than pre-disaster interventions (such as Cyclone warning systems and disaster-preparedness training). Using an asset-based wealth index created using principal component analysis, the article assesses if corruption affected wealth quartiles differently. Ultra-poor households were affected more by corruption in pre-disaster interventions than wealthier households. In contrast, the wealthiest quartile was affected more by corruption in certain post-disaster interventions, in particular public works and non-governmental interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahmud, Tanvir & Prowse, Martin, 2012. "Corruption in Cyclone Preparedness and Relief Efforts in Coastal Bangladesh: Lessons for Climate Adaptation?," IOB Working Papers 2012.04, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy (IOB).
  • Handle: RePEc:iob:wpaper:2012004
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    Cited by:

    1. Choyon Saha, 2015. "Dynamics of disaster-induced risk in southwestern coastal Bangladesh: an analysis on tropical Cyclone Aila 2009," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 75(1), pages 727-754, January.
    2. Shoji, Masahiro, 2017. "Religious Fractionalisation and Crimes in Disaster-Affected Communities: Survey Evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 78702, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Akter, Sonia & Mallick, Bishawjit, 2013. "An empirical investigation of socio-economic resilience to natural disasters," MPRA Paper 50375, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Rabiul Islam & Greg Walkerden & Marco Amati, 2017. "Households’ experience of local government during recovery from cyclones in coastal Bangladesh: resilience, equity, and corruption," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 85(1), pages 361-378, January.
    5. Janani Vivekananda & Janpeter Schilling & Shreya Mitra & Nisha Pandey, 2014. "On shrimp, salt and security: livelihood risks and responses in South Bangladesh and East India," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 16(6), pages 1141-1161, December.

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