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How Windfall Income Increases Gambling at Poker Machines

Author

Listed:
  • Hielke Buddelmeyer

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Kyle Peyton

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

In December 2008 and March-April 2009 the Australian Government used fiscal stimulus as a short-run economic stabilization tool for the first time since the 1990s. In May-June 2012, households received lump sum cheques as compensation for the introduction of the Carbon Tax scheduled for 1 July 2012. This paper examines the relationship between these financial windfalls and spending at electronic gaming machines (EGMs) using data from 62 local government areas in Victoria, Australia. The results show large increases in spending at EGMs during the periods when Australian households received economic stimulus cheques. Increased spending at EGMs in December 2008 amounted to 1% of the total stimulus for that period. We conclude that the 2008-2009 stimulus packages substantially increased gambling at EGMs in Victoria. We find no unexpected increase in spending at EGMs in the months when Carbon Tax compensation cheques were paid.

Suggested Citation

  • Hielke Buddelmeyer & Kyle Peyton, 2013. "How Windfall Income Increases Gambling at Poker Machines," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2013n01
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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2013n01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lisa Farrell, 2012. "Chasing Data: Sources of Data for the Study of Gambling Economics," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(4), pages 488-496, December.
    2. Bailey, Delia & Katz, Jonathan N., 2011. "Implementing Panel-Corrected Standard Errors in R: The pcse Package," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics.
    3. Epley, Nicholas & Gneezy, Ayelet, 2007. "The framing of financial windfalls and implications for public policy," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 36-47, February.
    4. Leigh Andrew, 2012. "How Much Did the 2009 Australian Fiscal Stimulus Boost Demand? Evidence from Household-Reported Spending Effects," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, pages 1-24.
    5. Leigh Andrew, 2012. "How Much Did the 2009 Australian Fiscal Stimulus Boost Demand? Evidence from Household-Reported Spending Effects," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, pages 1-24.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gambling; stimulus; Australia; windfall income; electronic gaming;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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