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Explaining Cluster Evolution from an Institutional Point of View: Evidence from a French Beverage Cluster

Author

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  • Moodysson , Jerker

    () (CIRCLE, Lund University)

  • Sack , Lionel

    () (CIRCLE, Lund University)

Abstract

This study analyzes the evolution of a ‘protected label of origin’ cluster in France with a particularly homogeneous and explicit institutional framework, which has given birth to significant incremental and radical changes in recent decades. By providing insights into these change processes and their institutional preconditions, the study provides an operational framework that disentangles different types of institutional change that are shaped by preconditions in the cluster - but that also shape the cluster on an aggregate level. The study distinguishes between institutional triggers for change of incremental versus radical nature, mainly focusing on inefficiencies that emerge over time in a given institutional framework. It suggests that incremental change processes have their main origin in developments on the regulative and normative dimension of institutions within the cluster, whereas more radical change processes require a wider set of preconditions, of which change on the cognitive dimension is crucial.

Suggested Citation

  • Moodysson , Jerker & Sack , Lionel, 2014. "Explaining Cluster Evolution from an Institutional Point of View: Evidence from a French Beverage Cluster," Papers in Innovation Studies 2014/23, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:lucirc:2014_023
    as

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    File URL: http://wp.circle.lu.se/upload/CIRCLE/workingpapers/201423_Moodysson_Sack.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anne Ter Wal & Ron Boschma, 2011. "Co-evolution of Firms, Industries and Networks in Space," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(7), pages 919-933.
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    4. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2006. "Path dependence and regional economic evolution," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(4), pages 395-437, August.
    5. Ron Martin, 2010. "Roepke Lecture in Economic Geography-Rethinking Regional Path Dependence: Beyond Lock-in to Evolution," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 86(1), pages 1-27, January.
    6. Ron Boschma & Dirk Fornahl, 2011. "Cluster Evolution and a Roadmap for Future Research," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(10), pages 1295-1298, November.
    7. Max-Peter Menzel & Dirk Fornahl, 2010. "Cluster life cycles--dimensions and rationales of cluster evolution," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 205-238, February.
    8. Michaela Trippl & Markus Grillitsch & Arne Isaksen & Tanja Sinozic, 2015. "Perspectives on Cluster Evolution: Critical Review and Future Research Issues," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(10), pages 2028-2044, October.
    9. Markku Sotarauta & Riina Pulkkinen, 2011. "Institutional Entrepreneurship for Knowledge Regions: In Search of a Fresh Set of Questions for Regional Innovation Studies," Environment and Planning C, , vol. 29(1), pages 96-112, February.
    10. Peter Maskell & Anders Malmberg, 2007. "Myopia, knowledge development and cluster evolution," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(5), pages 603-618, September.
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    1. repec:oup:scippl:v:44:y:2017:i:3:p:382-391. is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cluster; evolution; institutions; path dependence;

    JEL classification:

    • L66 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Food; Beverages; Cosmetics; Tobacco
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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