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Targeting the key player: An incentive-based approach

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  • Mohamed Belhaj

    (AMSE - Aix-Marseille Sciences Economiques - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - AMU - Aix Marseille Université)

  • Frédéric Deroïan

    (AMSE - Aix-Marseille Sciences Economiques - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - AMU - Aix Marseille Université)

Abstract

We consider a network game with local complementarities. A policymaker, aiming at minimizing or maximizing aggregate effort, contracts with a single agent on the network to trade effort change against transfer. The policymaker has to find the best agent and the optimal contract to offer. Our study shows that for all utilities with linear best-responses, it only takes two statistics about the position of each agent on the network to identify the key player: the Bonacich centrality and the self-loop centrality. We also characterize key players under linear quadratic utilities for various contractual arrangements.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohamed Belhaj & Frédéric Deroïan, 2018. "Targeting the key player: An incentive-based approach," Post-Print hal-01981885, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01981885
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmateco.2018.10.001
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-amu.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01981885
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Galeotti, A. & Golub, B. & Goyal, S., 2017. "Targeting Interventions in Networks," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1744, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Acemoglu, Daron & Malekian, Azarakhsh & Ozdaglar, Asu, 2016. "Network security and contagion," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 536-585.
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    5. Mohamed Belhaj & Frédéric Deroïan, 2015. "Contracting on Networks," Working Papers halshs-01102403, HAL.
    6. Coralio Ballester & Antoni Calvó-Armengol & Yves Zenou, 2006. "Who's Who in Networks. Wanted: The Key Player," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(5), pages 1403-1417, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mohamed Belhaj & Frédéric Deroïan & Shahir Safi, 2020. "Costly agreement-based transfers and targeting on networks with synergies," AMSE Working Papers 2015, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation

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