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Conséquences de la diffusion des innovations technologiques sur l'emploi industriel en Tunisie : Une analyse par les données de panel

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  • Sami Saafi

    () (LAB.RII - Laboratoire de Recherche sur l'Industrie et l'Innovation - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Université du Littoral Côte d'Opale, Unité de Recherche d'Analyses Quantitatives Appliquées - Université de Tunis [Tunis])

Abstract

The subject of this article, inspired by the compensation theory, is to discover the short and long term effect of technological innovations diffusion on employment in the case of developing countries, especially in Tunisia. Our results show that, even if in the short term, the effect of imported technological innovation and patents on employment is positive; this effect is negative in the medium and the long term. This result contradicts the theoretical predictions. This can be explained by the fact that Tunisian economy remains basically consumer and little productive of technological innovation. The complementarities between capital and job explain the increase of job opportunities with the increase of the imported technologies in short term. However, in medium and long term, Tunisian firms seem unable to put their technology in level. In most firms, the majority of inputs are imported and the use of obsolete machines and not much qualified employees is frequent. The process therefore does not implicate learning, nor massive training of technicians and engineers, and nor the production of similar technologies. When firms take advantage of the new technologies, the investors are encouraged to create more firms and new jobs. Moreover, the existence of the constraints of employees' mobility seems to prevent the functioning of the compensation mechanisms.

Suggested Citation

  • Sami Saafi, 2010. "Conséquences de la diffusion des innovations technologiques sur l'emploi industriel en Tunisie : Une analyse par les données de panel," Working paper serie RMT - Grenoble Ecole de Management hal-00477357, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:gemwpa:hal-00477357
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://hal.grenoble-em.com/hal-00477357
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Van Reenen, John, 1997. "Employment and Technological Innovation: Evidence from U.K. Manufacturing Firms," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(2), pages 255-284, April.
    2. Massimiliano Tancioni & Roberto Simonetti, 2002. "A Macroeconometric Model for the Analysis of the Impact of Technological Change and Trade on Employment," Journal of Interdisciplinary Economics, , vol. 13(1-3), pages 185-221, January.
    3. Alan B. Krueger, 1993. "How Computers Have Changed the Wage Structure: Evidence from Microdata, 1984–1989," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 33-60.
    4. Katsoulacos, Y., 1984. "Product innovation and employment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(1-2), pages 83-108.
    5. Richard R. Nelson, 1959. "The Simple Economics of Basic Scientific Research," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 67, pages 297-297.
    6. repec:sae:niesru:v:111:y::i:1:p:62-85 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Sami Saafi, 2007. "caractéristiques notables du système tunisien d’innovation," Working Papers 155, Laboratoire de Recherche sur l'Industrie et l'Innovation. ULCO / Research Unit on Industry and Innovation.
    8. Sophie Boutillier & Faridah Djellal & FaÏz Gallouj & Blandine Laperche & Dimitri Uzunidis, 2012. "L’innovation verte," Post-Print halshs-01112008, HAL.
    9. R. Layard & S. Nickell, 1985. "The Causes of British Unemployment," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 111(1), pages 62-85, February.
    10. Nickell, S. & Komg, P., 1989. "Technical Progress And Jobs," Papers 366, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
    11. Tommaso Antonucci & Mario Pianta, 2002. "Employment Effects of Product and Process Innovation in Europe," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 295-307.
    12. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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