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Displayed and Effective Spreads by Market (Revision of 4-92)

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Listed:
  • Marshall E. Blume
  • Michael A. Goldstein

Abstract

This study explores the integration of the markets for NYSE-listed stocks. Although the NYSE bid or offer is part of the best displayed intermarket quote roughly ninety percent of the time, there is some evidence that non-NYSE markets do on occasion contribute to price discovery. Actual execution prices for NYSE-listed stocks sometimes fall within the best displayed intermarket quote. The average effective spread across all stock is 13.5 cents, which is 76.2 percent of the best displayed intermarket spread. Often, the best displayed spread is almost double the average effective spread. For 100- and 200-share prints, the average effective spread on the NYSE is consistently less than on non-NYSE markets; but for prints of 1,000 to 3,000 shares, the reverse sometimes occurs.

Suggested Citation

  • Marshall E. Blume & Michael A. Goldstein, "undated". "Displayed and Effective Spreads by Market (Revision of 4-92)," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 27-92, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:pennfi:27-92
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Huang, Roger D. & Stoll, Hans R., 1996. "Dealer versus auction markets: A paired comparison of execution costs on NASDAQ and the NYSE," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 313-357, July.
    2. Keim, Donald B. & Madhavan, Ananth, 1997. "Transactions costs and investment style: an inter-exchange analysis of institutional equity trades," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 265-292, December.
    3. Goldstein, Michael A. & A. Kavajecz, Kenneth, 2000. "Eighths, sixteenths, and market depth: changes in tick size and liquidity provision on the NYSE," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 125-149, April.
    4. Boni, Leslie & Leach, Chris, 2004. "Expandable limit order markets," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 145-185, February.
    5. Bacidore, Jeffrey & Ross, Katharine & Sofianos, George, 2003. "Quantifying market order execution quality at the New York stock exchange," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 281-307, May.
    6. Macey, Jonathan R. & O'Hara, Maureen, 1997. "The Law and Economics of Best Execution," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 188-223, July.
    7. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1996. "Order characteristics and stock price evolution An application to program trading," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 129-149, May.
    8. Ali, Ashiq & Hwang, Lee-Seok & Trombley, Mark A., 2003. "Arbitrage risk and the book-to-market anomaly," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 355-373, August.
    9. Mashruwala, Christina & Rajgopal, Shivaram & Shevlin, Terry, 2006. "Why is the accrual anomaly not arbitraged away? The role of idiosyncratic risk and transaction costs," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 3-33, October.
    10. Louis K. C. Chan & Josef Lakonishok, 1995. "A Cross-Market Comparison of Institutional Equity Trading Costs," NBER Working Papers 5374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Hu, Gang, 2009. "Measures of implicit trading costs and buy-sell asymmetry," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 418-437, August.
    12. Ahn, Hee-Joon & Cao, Charles & Choe, Hyuk, 2001. "Share repurchase tender offers and bid-ask spreads," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 445-478, March.
    13. Murphy Jun Jie Lee, 2013. "The Microstructure of Trading Processes on the Singapore Exchange," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 4.
    14. Ende, Bartholomäus & Lutat, Marco, 2010. "Trade-throughs in European cross-traded equities after transaction costs: Empirical evidence for the EURO STOXX 50," CFS Working Paper Series 2010/15, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    15. Chalmers, John M. R. & Kadlec, Gregory B., 1998. "An empirical examination of the amortized spread," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 159-188, May.
    16. Krishnamurti, Chandrasekhar & Sequeira, John M. & Fangjian, Fu, 2003. "Stock exchange governance and market quality," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(9), pages 1859-1878, September.

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