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Inequality, Segregation, and Redistribution

Author

Listed:
  • Bjorvatn, K.
  • Cappelen, A.W.

Abstract

In a model of endogenous choice of location and endogenous aversion against inequality, we demonstrate that large pre-tax difference in income may lead to a residential segregation of rich and poor. Such segregation may reduce the social attachment between the groups in society, and reduce the willingness of the rich to make transfers to the poor.

Suggested Citation

  • Bjorvatn, K. & Cappelen, A.W., 2000. "Inequality, Segregation, and Redistribution," Papers 13/00, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration-.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:norgee:13/00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    2. Thomas Piketty, 1995. "Social Mobility and Redistributive Politics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 551-584.
    3. Horstmann, Ignatius J & Scharf, Kimberley, 1999. "The New Federalism: Distributional Conflict, Voluntarism and Segregation," CEPR Discussion Papers 2273, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Persson, Mats, 1995. " Why Are Taxes So High in Egalitarian Societies?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 97(4), pages 569-580, December.
    5. Douglas Massey, 1996. "The age of extremes: Concentrated affluence and poverty in the twenty-first century," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(4), pages 395-412, November.
    6. Perotti, Roberto, 1996. "Growth, Income Distribution, and Democracy: What the Data Say," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 149-187, June.
    7. W.Norton Grubb, 1982. "The Dynamic Implications of the Tiebout Model: the Changing Composition of Boston Communities, 1960-1970," Public Finance Review, , vol. 10(1), pages 17-38, January.
    8. Roland Benabou, 2000. "Unequal Societies: Income Distribution and the Social Contract," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 96-129, March.
    9. Roberts, Kevin W. S., 1977. "Voting over income tax schedules," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 329-340, December.
    10. Pauly, Mark V., 1973. "Income redistribution as a local public good," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 35-58, February.
    11. Meltzer, Allan H & Richard, Scott F, 1981. "A Rational Theory of the Size of Government," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 914-927, October.
    12. Sandmo, Agnar, 1976. "Optimal taxation : An introduction to the literature," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1-2), pages 37-54.
    13. Bassett, William F. & Burkett, John P. & Putterman, Louis, 1999. "Income distribution, government transfers, and the problem of unequal influence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 207-228, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ghassan, Hassan B., 2015. "A Consumer Model and Social Welfare Based on the Writings of Shibani (750-805 AD, 131-189 AH)," MPRA Paper 72441, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Mar 2016.
    2. Michele Giuseppe Giuranno, 2009. "Regional Income Disparity and the Size of the Public Sector," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(5), pages 697-719, October.
    3. Shaun A. Golding, 2016. "Gentrification and Segregated Wealth in Rural America: Home Value Sorting in Destination Counties," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(1), pages 127-146, February.
    4. Lind, Jo Thori, 2007. "Fractionalization and the size of government," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1-2), pages 51-76, February.
    5. Schaeffer, Y. & Charlot, S., 2012. "Inequality aversion, income redistribution and economic geography," Working Papers 201204, Grenoble Applied Economics Laboratory (GAEL).
    6. Giuranno, Michele Giuseppe, 2005. "Income Inequality and the Size of the Public Sector," Economics Discussion Papers 8895, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    7. Francisco Martínez Mora, 2004. "The impact of fiscal decentralization on income segregation," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2004/68, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    8. Bjorvatn, Kjetil & Cappelen, Alexander W., 2004. "Globalisation, inequality and redistribution," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 33, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    9. repec:got:cegedp:33 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    DISTRIBUTION ; INCOME ; TAXES;

    JEL classification:

    • D33 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Factor Income Distribution
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies

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