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Inequality, Segregation, and Redistribution

  • Bjorvatn, K.
  • Cappelen, A.W.

In a model of endogenous choice of location and endogenous aversion against inequality, we demonstrate that large pre-tax difference in income may lead to a residential segregation of rich and poor. Such segregation may reduce the social attachment between the groups in society, and reduce the willingness of the rich to make transfers to the poor.

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Paper provided by Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration- in its series Papers with number 13/00.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:norgee:13/00
Contact details of provider: Postal: NORWEGIAN SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, HELLEVEIEN 30, 5035 BERGEN SANDVIKEN NORWAY.
Phone: 5595 9000
Fax: 5595 9100
Web page: http://www.nhh.no/
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  1. Roberts, Kevin W. S., 1977. "Voting over income tax schedules," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 329-340, December.
  2. Pauly, Mark V., 1973. "Income redistribution as a local public good," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 35-58, February.
  3. Roland Benabou, 2000. "Unequal Societies: Income Distribution and the Social Contract," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 96-129, March.
  4. Sandmo, Agnar, 1976. "Optimal taxation : An introduction to the literature," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1-2), pages 37-54.
  5. Perotti, Roberto, 1996. " Growth, Income Distribution, and Democracy: What the Data Say," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 149-87, June.
  6. Thomas Piketty, 1994. "Social Mobility and Redistributive Politics," Working papers 94-15, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  7. Horstmann, Ignatius J & Scharf, Kimberley, 1999. "The New Federalism: Distributional Conflict, Voluntarism and Segregation," CEPR Discussion Papers 2273, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Bassett, William F. & Burkett, John P. & Putterman, Louis, 1999. "Income distribution, government transfers, and the problem of unequal influence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 207-228, June.
  9. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416.
  10. Douglas Massey, 1996. "The age of extremes: Concentrated affluence and poverty in the twenty-first century," Demography, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 395-412, November.
  11. Meltzer, Allan H & Richard, Scott F, 1981. "A Rational Theory of the Size of Government," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 914-27, October.
  12. W.Norton Grubb, 1982. "The Dynamic Implications of the Tiebout Model: the Changing Composition of Boston Communities, 1960-1970," Public Finance Review, , vol. 10(1), pages 17-38, January.
  13. Persson, Mats, 1995. " Why Are Taxes So High in Egalitarian Societies?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 97(4), pages 569-80, December.
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