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The Arbitrage Pricing Theorem with non Expected Utility Preferences


  • Kelsey, D.
  • Milne, F.


The arbitrage pricing theorem of finance shows that in certain circumstances the price of a financial asset may be written as a linear combination of the prices of certain market factors. This result is usually proved with von Neumann-Morgenstern preferences. In this paper we show that the result is robust in the sense that it will remain true if certain kinds of non expected utility preferences are used. We consider Machina preferences, the rank dependent model and non-additive subjective probabilities.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Kelsey, D. & Milne, F., 1990. "The Arbitrage Pricing Theorem with non Expected Utility Preferences," Papers 217, Australian National University - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:aunaec:217

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hansen, Lars Peter & Hodrick, Robert J, 1980. "Forward Exchange Rates as Optimal Predictors of Future Spot Rates: An Econometric Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(5), pages 829-853, October.
    2. Maxwell L. King & Michael McAleer, 1987. "Further Results on Testing AR (1) Against MA (1) Disturbances in the Linear Regression Model," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(4), pages 649-663.
    3. Hall, A D & McAleer, Michael, 1989. "A Monte Carlo Study of Some Tests of Model Adequacy in Time Series Analysis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 7(1), pages 95-106, January.
    4. Colin McKenzie & Michael McAleer, 1997. "On Efficient Estimation and Correct Inference in Models with Generated Regressors: a General Approach," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 48(4), pages 368-389, December.
    5. A. R. Pagan & A. D. Hall & P. K. Trivedi, 1983. "Assessing the Variability of Inflation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(4), pages 585-596.
    6. Naorayex K. Dastoor & Michael McAleer, 1985. "On the Consistency of Joint and Paired Tests for Non-Nested Regression Models," Working Papers 614, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    7. Breusch, Trevor S., 1980. "Useful invariance results for generalized regression models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 327-340, August.
    8. S. P. Burke & L. G. Godfrey & A. R. Tremayne, 1990. "Testing AR(1) Against MA(1) Disturbances in the Linear Regression Model: An Alternative Procedure," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(1), pages 135-145.
    9. Reinsel, Greg, 1979. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Stochastic Linear Difference Equations with Autoregressive Moving Average Errors," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 129-151, January.
    10. Silvapulle, Paramsothy & King, Maxwell L, 1991. "Testing Moving Average against Autoregressive Disturbances in the Linear-Regression Model," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 9(3), pages 329-335, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Erkan Yalcin, 2002. "Existence of Equilibrium in Incomplete Markets with Non-Ordered Preferences," GE, Growth, Math methods 0204002, EconWPA.
    2. Sujoy Mukerji & Jean-Marc Tallon, 2001. "Ambiguity Aversion and Incompleteness of Financial Markets," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(4), pages 883-904.
    3. Eichberger, Jürgen & Kelsey, David, 2007. "Ambiguity," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 07-50, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
      • Jürgen Eichberger & David Kelsey, 2007. "Ambiguity," Working Papers 0448, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2007.
      • Eichberger, Jürgen & Kelsey, David, 2007. "Ambiguity," Papers 07-50, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    4. Aldo Montesano, 2008. "Effects of Uncertainty Aversion on the Call Option Market," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 65(2), pages 97-123, September.
    5. Naqvi, Nadeem, 2012. "Impossibility of interpersonal social identity diversification under binary preferences," MPRA Paper 41365, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Kelsey, David & Yalcin, Erkan, 2007. "The arbitrage pricing theorem with incomplete preferences," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 90-105, July.
    7. Naqvi, Nadeem, 2012. "Why is the Workplace Racially Segregated by Occupation?," MPRA Paper 43352, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    prices ; financial market ; economic models;


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