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Urgent actions needed to prevent recurring food crises:

Author

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  • Fan, Shenggen
  • Torero, Maximo
  • Headey, Derek D.

Abstract

Recent trends in food prices—higher levels and higher volatility—mirror trends predicted by a number of experts. Given the complex web of factors influencing global food security, governments of developed and developing countries, as well as international organizations, must use a comprehensive approach to prevent a food crisis reoccurrence. This comprehensive approach should comprise a number of initiatives and reforms; while some of these have been proposed before, their merits are even more relevant today and justify reprioritization and reallocation of national and international budgets. There are 7 main initiatives that governments and institutions should promptly implement. 1. Effective policies and technology investments to minimize food-fuel competition. 2. Social protection, especially social safety nets, for the most vulnerable groups. 3. Transparent, fair, and open global trade. 4. A global emergency physical grain reserve. 5. Policies and investments to promote agricultural growth, in particular smallholder productivity, in the face of climate change. 6. Investments by national governments in climate change adaptation and mitigation using the full potential that agriculture offers. 7. An international working group to regularly monitor the world food situation and trigger action to prevent excessive price volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Fan, Shenggen & Torero, Maximo & Headey, Derek D., 2011. "Urgent actions needed to prevent recurring food crises:," Policy briefs 16, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:polbrf:16
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hannah Pieters & Andrea Guariso & Anneleen Vandeplas, 2013. "Conceptual framework for the analysis of the determinants of food and nutrition security," FOODSECURE Working papers 13, LEI Wageningen UR.
    2. Kumar, Neha & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2011. "Gendered impacts of the 2007-08 food price crisis: Evidence using panel data from rural Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 1093, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Maystadt, Jean-François & Trinh Tan, Jean-François & Breisinger, Clemens, 2014. "Does food security matter for transition in Arab countries?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 106-115.
    4. Waithaka, Michael & Nelson, Gerald C. & Thomas, Timothy S. & Kyotalimye, Miriam (ed.), 2013. "East African agriculture and climate change: A comprehensive analysis," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-205-5.
    5. Shenggen Fan, 2014. "Comment on "Food Price Volatility and Domestic Stabilization Policies in Developing Countries"," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Food Price Volatility, pages 306-309 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ecker, Olivier & Breisinger, Clemens, 2012. "The food security system: A new conceptual framework," IFPRI discussion papers 1166, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Kumar, Neha & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2013. "Gendered impacts of the 2007–2008 food price crisis: Evidence using panel data from rural Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 11-22.
    8. Abbott, Philip C. & Hurt, Christopher & Tyner, Wallace E., 2011. "What’s Driving Food Prices in 2011?," Issue Reports 112927, Farm Foundation.

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