IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ets/wpaper/4.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce: A Fifteen-Country Study with the Fertility and Family Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Andreas Diekmann
  • Kurt Schmidheiny

Abstract

Studies mainly from the United States provide evidence that children of divorced parents face a higher risk of divorce in their own marriages. We estimate and analyze the effects of divorce transmission using comparative individual data from the United Nations for 13 eastern and western European countries as well as for Canada and the United States. We find substantial and highly statistically significant transmission effects in all samples. This shows that the intergenerational transmission of divorce is a widespread phenomenon observed without a single exception in our data covering a large number of countries with differing historical, institutional, and cultural contexts.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Diekmann & Kurt Schmidheiny, 2004. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce: A Fifteen-Country Study with the Fertility and Family Survey," ETH Zurich Sociology Working Papers 4, ETH Zurich, Chair of Sociology, revised Mar 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:ets:wpaper:4
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://repec.ethz.ch/ets/papers/diekmann_schmidheiny_transmission.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2008
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nicholas Wolfinger, 1999. "Trends in the intergenerational transmission of divorce," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(3), pages 415-420, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Benoît Laplante, 2016. "A matter of norms: Family background, religion, and generational change in the diffusion of first union breakdown among French-speaking Quebeckers," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(27), pages 783-812.
    2. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Dahmann, Sarah C. & Salamanca, Nicolás & Zhu, Anna, 2017. "Intergenerational Disadvantage: Learning about Equal Opportunity from Social Assistance Receipt," IZA Discussion Papers 11070, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Trude Lappegård & Elizabeth Thomson, 2018. "Intergenerational Transmission of Multipartner Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(6), pages 2205-2228, December.
    4. Sabine Zinn, 2014. "The MicSim Package of R: An Entry-Level Toolkit for Continuous-Time Microsimulation," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 7(3), pages 3-32.
    5. Anna Christina D'Addio, 2007. "Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage: Mobility or Immobility Across Generations?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 52, OECD Publishing.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. John Robert Warren, 2015. "Potential Data Sources for a New Study of Social Mobility in the United States," The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, , vol. 657(1), pages 208-246, January.
    2. Viviana Salinas, 2016. "Changes in Cohabitation After the Birth of the First Child in Chile," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(3), pages 351-375, June.
    3. Jonathan Gruber, 2004. "Is Making Divorce Easier Bad for Children? The Long-Run Implications of Unilateral Divorce," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(4), pages 799-834, October.
    4. Hiller, Victor & Recoules, Magali, 2013. "Changes in divorce patterns: Culture and the law," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 77-87.
    5. Kathrin Morosow & Heike Trappe, 2018. "Intergenerational transmission of fertility timing in Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 38(46), pages 1389-1422.
    6. Xi Song, 2016. "Diverging Mobility Trajectories: Grandparent Effects on Educational Attainment in One- and Two-Parent Families in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(6), pages 1905-1932, December.
    7. Trude Lappegård & Elizabeth Thomson, 2018. "Intergenerational Transmission of Multipartner Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(6), pages 2205-2228, December.
    8. Henriette Engelhardt & Heike Trappe & Jaap Dronkers, 2002. "Differences in Family Policies and the Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 6(11), pages 295-324.
    9. Kim Caarls & Helga A. G. Valk, 2018. "Regional Diffusion of Divorce in Turkey," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 34(4), pages 609-636, October.
    10. Nicholas Wolfinger, 2011. "More Evidence for Trends in the Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce: A Completed Cohort Approach Using Data From the General Social Survey," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(2), pages 581-592, May.
    11. Anna Christina D'Addio, 2007. "Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage: Mobility or Immobility Across Generations?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 52, OECD Publishing.
    12. Giulia Ferrari & Carole Bonnet & Anne Solaz, 2019. "‘Will the one who keeps the children keep the house?’ Residential mobility after divorce by parenthood status and custody arrangements in France," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 40(14), pages 359-394.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Divorce; Divorce Risk; Intergenerational Transmission; Consequences of Divorce; Child Well-being;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ets:wpaper:4. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.socio.ethz.ch/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Heidi Bruderer The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Heidi Bruderer to update the entry or send us the correct address (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.socio.ethz.ch/ .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.