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Height and Social Status in Eighteenth-Century Germany

Author

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  • John Komlos

    () (The Institute of Economic History, Department of Economics, University of Munich)

Abstract

Examines the height of German youth in the late eighteenth century, and documents the very large differences in height between the lower and upper classes. Shows that the height of the upper class did not decline at the end of the 18th century as did that of the common men.

Suggested Citation

  • John Komlos, "undated". "Height and Social Status in Eighteenth-Century Germany," Articles by John Komlos 27, Department of Economics, University of Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehb:komart:27
    Note: Data has been deposited in ICPSR data archive, no. 09720.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Komlos, "undated". "On the Biological Standard of Living of Eighteenth-Century Americans: Taller, Richer, Healthier," Articles by John Komlos 3, Department of Economics, University of Munich.
    2. Komlos, John & Baten, Jörg, 2003. "Looking Backward and Looking Forward: Anthropometric Research and the Development of Social Science History," Discussion Papers in Economics 59, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    3. Lundborg, Petter & Nystedt, Paul & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2009. "The Height Premium in Earnings: The Role of Physical Capacity and Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 4266, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Thomas Jordan, 2011. "Sons of St. Patrick: Quality of Life and Heights of Young Irish Males at Mid-Nineteenth Century," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 102(3), pages 389-408, July.
    5. Petri Böckerman & Edvard Johansson & Urpo Kiiskinen & Markku Heilövaara, 2010. "Does Physical Capacity Explain the Height Premium?," Working Papers 1074, University of Tampere, School of Management, Economics.
    6. Richard H. Steckel, 1995. "Percentiles of Modern Height Standards for Use in Historical Research," NBER Historical Working Papers 0075, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    height; social status; Germany; 18th century;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • N33 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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