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Biotech by Bricolage? Agency, institutional relatedness and new path development in peripheral regions

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  • Luis Carvalho

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  • Mario Vale

    ()

Abstract

This paper develops a framework to understand new industrial path development in peripheral regions based on notions of ?bricolage? and ?institutional relatedness?. While the first stresses the agency of (heterogeneous) actors? resourcefulness and strategic improvisation co-shaping new industrial paths, the latter highlights the transposition of related institutional settings within regions to amplify (or to limit) the search space for new industries. These arguments are used in conjunction to explain the development of an unlikely biotechnology path in the Portuguese Centro region, analysed since its emergence and over a period of more than ten years.

Suggested Citation

  • Luis Carvalho & Mario Vale, 2018. "Biotech by Bricolage? Agency, institutional relatedness and new path development in peripheral regions," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1801, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Jan 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1801
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    File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1801.pdf
    File Function: Version Januari 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mads Bruun Ingstrup & Max-Peter Menzel, 2019. "The emergence of relatedness between industries: The example of offshore oil and gas and offshore wind energy in Esbjerg, Denmark," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1929, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Oct 2019.
    2. Danny Mackinnon & Stuart Dawley & Andy Pike & Andrew Cumbers, 2018. "Rethinking Path Creation: A Geographical Political Economy Approach," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1825, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Jun 2018.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Path creation; Bricolage; Institutional Relatedness; Biotechnology; Emergence; Peripheral regions;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact

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