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Investor Attention and the Underreaction to Stock Recommendations

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  • Loh, Roger

    (Ohio State U)

Abstract

Investors' reaction to stock recommendations is often incomplete so that there is a predictable post-recommendation drift. I investigate whether investor inattention contributes to this drift by using turnover as a proxy for investor attention. I find that the recommendation drift of firms with low prior turnover is more than double in magnitude compared to that of firms with high prior turnover. Additional proxies for attention, such as analyst coverage, institutional ownership, the amount of distracting news in a day, or a measure of residual turnover that controls for liquidity and uncertainty, produce similar results. Volume reactions around the recommendation event show that investors fail to react promptly to recommendations on low attention stocks. Together, the evidence suggests that investor inattention is a plausible explanation for investors' underreaction to stock recommendations.

Suggested Citation

  • Loh, Roger, 2008. "Investor Attention and the Underreaction to Stock Recommendations," Working Paper Series 2008-2, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:ohidic:2008-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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