IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/eab/financ/23637.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

An Asian Perspective on Global Financial Reforms

Author

Listed:
  • Peter J. Morgan

    (Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI))

  • Victor Pontines

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to better understand the likely impact on Asian economies and financial institutions of various recent global financial reforms, including Basel III capital adequacy and liquidity rules. Part one reviews the lessons of the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2007–09 and their relevance for Asian economies. Part two describes the major regulatory reforms that have been announced and possible concerns about their impacts on emerging economies. Part three reviews the literature aimed at quantifying the impacts of Basel III capital adequacy rules. Part four develops our methodology and analysis of the quantitative impact of Basel III capital adequacy rules on a panel of Southeast Asian financial institutions with emphasis on the effect on economic growth. Finally, the study concludes with a discussion on the policy implications of the results obtained from the previous section for Asian financial sectors and economies. Overall, we find that the Basel III capital adequacy rules are likely to have limited impacts on economic growth in Asia, but other financial regulations, including liquidity standards and rules for over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives, could have stunting effects on financial development in the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter J. Morgan & Victor Pontines, 2013. "An Asian Perspective on Global Financial Reforms," Finance Working Papers 23637, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:financ:23637
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.eaber.org/node/23637
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Scott Roger & Jan Vlcek, 2011. "Macroeconomic Costs of Higher Bank Capital and Liquidity Requirements," IMF Working Papers 11/103, International Monetary Fund.
    2. John B. Taylor, 2009. "The Financial Crisis and the Policy Responses: An Empirical Analysis of What Went Wrong," NBER Working Papers 14631, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. repec:fip:fedgsq:y:2005:i:mar10 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Robert-Paul Berben & Beata Bierut & Jan Willem van den End & Jan Kakes, 2010. "Macro-effects of higher capital and liquidity requirements for banks," DNB Occasional Studies 803, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    5. Patrick Slovik & Boris Cournède, 2011. "Macroeconomic Impact of Basel III," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 844, OECD Publishing.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Vanessa Le Lesle & Franziska L Ohnsorge & Minsuk Kim & Srikant Seshadri, 2014. "Why Complementarity Matters for Stability—Hong Kong SAR and Singapore as Asian Financial Centers," IMF Working Papers 14/119, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Reform; global financial crisis; Basel III; regulatory reform; Capital Adequacy Ratio; Asian economies; Southeast Asian; financaial institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eab:financ:23637. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shiro Armstrong). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/eaberau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.