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Persistence of Business Cycles in Multisector RBC Models

Author

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  • Benhabib, Jess
  • Perli, Roberto
  • Sakellaris, Plutarchos

Abstract

In this paper we explore whether the changing composition of output in response to technology shocks can play a significant role in the propagation of shocks over time. For this purpose we study two multisector RBC models, with two and a three sectors. We find that, whereas the two sectors model requires a high intertemporal elasticity of substitution fo consumption to match the dynamic properties of the US data, the three sector model has a strong propagation mechanism under conventional parameterizations, as long as the factor intensities in the three sectors are different enough.

Suggested Citation

  • Benhabib, Jess & Perli, Roberto & Sakellaris, Plutarchos, 1997. "Persistence of Business Cycles in Multisector RBC Models," Working Papers 97-19, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cvs:starer:97-19
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nishimura, Kazuo & Venditti, Alain, 2002. "Intersectoral Externalities and Indeterminacy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 140-157, July.
    2. Otrok, Christopher, 2001. "On measuring the welfare cost of business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 61-92, February.
    3. David N. DeJong & Beth F. Ingram, 2001. "The Cyclical Behavior of Skill Acquisition," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(3), pages 536-561, July.
    4. Mathä, Thomas Y. & Pierrard, Olivier, 2011. "Search in the product market and the real business cycle," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1172-1191, August.
    5. Alison Butler & Michael R. Pakko, 1998. "R&D spending and cyclical fluctuations: putting the "technology" in technology shocks," Working Papers 1998-020, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    6. Weder, Mark, 2000. "Can Habit Formation Solve the Consumption Anomaly in the Two-Sector Business Cycle Model?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 433-444, July.
    7. Nigar Hashimzade & Salvador Ortigueira, 2004. "Endogenous Business Cycle with Search in the Labour Market," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2004 78, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    8. Stefano Bosi & Francesco Magris & Alain Venditti, 2005. "Multiple equilibria in a cash-in-advance two-sector economy," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 1(2), pages 131-149.
    9. Stefano Bosi & Francesco Magris & Alain Venditti, 2003. "Indeterminacy in a Cash-in-Advance Two-Sector Economy," Documents de recherche 03-04, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
    10. Veroude, Alexandra, 2012. "The Role of Mining in an Australian Business Cycle Model," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Freemantle, Australia 124473, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    11. Nishimura, Kazuo & Venditti, Alain, 2004. "Indeterminacy And The Role Of Factor Substitutability," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(04), pages 436-465, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    MACROECONOMICS ; BUSINESS CYCLES ; ECONOMIC GROWTH;

    JEL classification:

    • E00 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - General
    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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