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The Bell Jar: Commercial Interest Rates between Two Revolutions, 1688-1789

Author

Listed:
  • Flandreau, Marc
  • Galimard, Christophe
  • Jobst, Clemens
  • Nogues-Marco, Pilar

Abstract

This paper exploits arbitrage conditions for bills of exchange with different maturities to provide new evidence on commercial interest rates in Amsterdam, London, and Paris during the 18th century. The lesson that emerges is that commercial interest rates were very low in all three centers and did not differ much from one location to another. This suggests that a transnational capital market resulting from the Commercial Revolution pre-dated to the British 'Financial Revolution' of the 18th century.

Suggested Citation

  • Flandreau, Marc & Galimard, Christophe & Jobst, Clemens & Nogues-Marco, Pilar, 2006. "The Bell Jar: Commercial Interest Rates between Two Revolutions, 1688-1789," CEPR Discussion Papers 5940, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:5940
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Flandreau M. et al. (2009) The question was not how to develop finance
      by Ben in Economic History Blog on 2009-08-30 14:36:00

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marc Flandreau & Christophe Galimard & Clemens Jobst & Pilar Nogués-Marco, 2009. "Monetary geography before the Industrial Revolution," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 2(2), pages 149-171.
    2. Mitchener, Kris James & Weidenmier, Marc D, 2013. "Searching for Irving Fisher," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 133, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    3. Jobst, Clemens & Ugolini, Stefano, 2014. "The coevolution of money markets and monetary policy, 1815-2008," Working Paper Series 1756, European Central Bank.
    4. Vincent Bignon & Marc Flandreau & Stefano Ugolini, 2012. "Bagehot for beginners: the making of lender‐of‐last‐resort operations in the mid‐nineteenth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(2), pages 580-608, May.
    5. Nogues-Marco, Pilar, 2017. "Money Markets and Exchange Rates in Pre-Industrial Europe," Working Papers unige:100808, University of Geneva, Paul Bairoch Institute of Economic History.
    6. Peter Koudijs, 2013. "The boats that did not sail: Asset Price Volatility and Market Efficiency in a Natural Experiment," NBER Working Papers 18831, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Pablo Martín-Aceña & Pilar Nogues-Marco, 2012. "Crisis bancarias en la historia de España. Del Antiguo Régimen a los orígenes del capitalismo moderno," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1201, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    8. Vincent Bignon & Marc Flandreau & Stefano Ugolini, 2009. "Bagehot for beginners: The making of lending of last resort operations in the mid-19th century," Working Paper 2009/22, Norges Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    early financial derivative products; financial development; financial integration; interest rates;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • N23 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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