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An econometric estimation of the demand for private health insurance

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  • Carol Propper

Abstract

The demand for private health insurance in the UK has risen rapidly in the last decade. The paper discusses the nature of the demand for private health insurance in a health care market dominated by a public supplier, in which the consumer may neither opt out of his contribution to the National Health Service nor lose his entitlement to a free-at-any-point-of-delivery publically provided medical care. The demand for private health cover is estimated using data from the 1983 General Household Survey. The results indicate that income, the health and the medical services utilisation of adult members of households are significant determinants of the probability of purchase of health insurance cover. The results also suggest that we lack information on the nature of decision to take out and give up health insurance cover. The paper outlines research currently underway to collect and analyse data about health insurance purchase from a national representative sample of households.

Suggested Citation

  • Carol Propper, 1987. "An econometric estimation of the demand for private health insurance," Working Papers 024chedp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:chy:respap:24chedp
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    File URL: http://www.york.ac.uk/media/che/documents/papers/discussionpapers/CHE%20Discussion%20Paper%2024.pdf
    File Function: First version, 1987
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Denise Doiron & Glenn Jones & Elizabeth Savage, 2006. "Healthy, wealthy and insured? The role of self-assessed health in the demand for private health insurance, CHERE Working Paper 2006/2," Working Papers 2006/2, CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney.
    2. Cormac O'Dea & Ian Preston, 2012. "The distributional impact of public spending in the UK," IFS Working Papers W12/06, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Ángel López-Nicolás & Marcos Vera-Hernández, 2002. "Are tax subsidies for private medical insurance self-financing? Evidence from a microsimulation model for outpatient and inpatient episodes," Economics Working Papers 632, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Oct 2004.
    4. Wuppermann, Amelie Catherine, 2011. "Empirical Essays in Health and Education Economics," Munich Dissertations in Economics 13187, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    5. J. François Outreville, 2011. "The relationship between insurance growth and economic development - 80 empirical papers for a review of the literature," ICER Working Papers 12-2011, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    6. Denise Doiron & Glenn Jones & Elizabeth Savage, 2008. "Healthy, wealthy and insured? The role of self-assessed health in the demand for private health insurance," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 317-334.
    7. Panos Kanavos & Marin Gemmill-Toyama, 2010. "Prescription drug coverage among elderly and disabled Americans: can Medicare—Part D reduce inequities in access?," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 203-218, September.
    8. Aida Isabel Tavares & Pedro Pita Barros, 2011. "Ex-ante Moral Hazard and Primary Prevention, evidence from Portugal," Working Papers de Economia (Economics Working Papers) 56, Departamento de Economia, Gestão e Engenharia Industrial, Universidade de Aveiro.
    9. Ricardo Sanhueza & Jaime Ruiz-Tagle, 2002. "Choosing Health Insurance in a Dual Health Care System: The Chilean Case," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 5, pages 157-184, May.
    10. Marisol Rodriguez & Alexandrina Stoyanova, 2008. "Changes in the demand for private medical insurance following a shift in tax incentives," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 185-202.
    11. Bhat Ramesh & Jain Nishant, 2007. "A Study of Factors Affecting the Renewal of Health Insurance Policy," IIMA Working Papers WP2007-01-02, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
    12. Matthew Jowett, 2004. "Theoretical insights into the development of health insurance in low-income countries," Working Papers 188chedp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    13. Denzil Fiebig & Elizabeth Savage & Rosalie Viney, 2006. "Does the reason for buying health insurance influence behaviour? CHERE Working Paper 2006/1," Working Papers 2006/1, CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney.
    14. Ali Asgary & Ken Willis & Ali Taghvaei & Mojtaba Rafeian, 2004. "Estimating rural households’ willingness to pay for health insurance," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 5(3), pages 209-215, September.
    15. Meliyanni Johar & Glenn Jones & Michael Keane & Elizabeth Savage & Olena Stavrunova, 2010. "Waiting times and the decision to buy private health insurance. CHERE Working Paper 2010/9," Working Papers 2010/9, CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney.

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    Keywords

    private health; insurance;

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